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Showing posts from August, 2008

Regent Law Alum favored at Beijing Olympics

Kimberly Holland (Law ’02), president and CEO of sports agency Icon Management is already a champion because of her status as one of the only female sports agents in a male-dominated business.

But she is also celebrating because she represents seven top athletes participating in Track and Field events in the 2008 Olympics.

And so far, two of them have brought home medals.

Angelo Taylor secured the gold in the men’s 400-meter hurdles and Shawn Crawford won the silver in the men’s 200-meter. Several of the remaining five have ranked in favorable positions to go for the gold as well.

See a recent article about Holland’s path from Regent Law School to her success as an agent here.

Presidential Predictions by Regent Law Profesor

Kudos to Law Professor Brad Jacob, whose op-ed piece, "Balancing the Scales of Justice," was published in today's Washington Times.

Professor Jacob discusses how the outcome of the presidential election could change the make-up of the Supreme Court.

Read it here.

Regent Law Welcomes New Faculty: Prof. Chris Rehn

Regent Law School warmly welcomes Prof. Chris Rehn to its faculty.

See a video introduction to Prof. Rehn here, and view his complete faculty profile here.

Rehn comes to Regent Law after teaching Business Law and related coursework at Dordt College in Sioux Center, Iowa.

He’s excited to be teaching Business Associations this fall.

“As Christians, we are called to reform all of life,” Rehn says. “This includes law. I look forward to helping law students understand that it’s not only important to go out there and pray before they go to court or begin a day’s work at their firms, for example, but it’s also very important that they work to improve the larger structures in which law is practiced.”

Rehn earned his MBA from Eastern University and his J.D. from Cornell; he then spent year on a fellowship studying law in Heidelberg, Germany before returning to the states to teach.

He hopes to get involved with local Hampton Roads businesses and local politics in an advisory or board member capacity.

Law Professor Publishes on the Military Commissions Act of 2006

For Professor Ben Madison, the prosecution of the criminally accused is more than a common feature of our legal system: it’s a principle found in the majority of philosophical systems, one with roots in the Judeo-Christian tradition.

Madison is interested in applying a Judeo-Christian understanding of justice to the pressing legal questions of our time, specifically within the domain of cases tried under the Military Commissions Act of 2006 (MCA).

In his most recent article, Madison argues that the MCA helps ensure the integrity of justice by allowing for flexibility in the handling of classified evidence – the disclosure of which often results in the dismissal of a case. He also explores how the MCA informs the quest to balance societal justice with individual justice, and offers suggestions as how the MCA can be further improved towards this end.

According to Madison, “Scholarship in this area has been ideologically one-sided. This article objectively looks at the MCA as a corrective t…

Blogging Regent Law School & ACLJ: Student Interns Work on Supreme Court Case

Most law students will never have the opportunity to see their research appear in a brief filed for review by the Supreme Court, let alone witness first-hand the most exciting legal developments of our time.

A group of Regent Law students will.

The newly launched “Regent Law & ACLJ” blog catalogues Regent Law ACLJ interns helping make history through their work on an important case involving crucial 1st Amendment distinctions between government speech and private speech.

Opening arguments for the case, Pleasant Grove City v. Summum (No. 07-665), will be presented before the Supreme Court by ACLJ Chief Counsel Jay Sekulow and are scheduled to begin this fall.

Read a summary of the case and its implications here.

Learn about the Regent Law ACLJ interns here.