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Law Chapel Highlights “Operation Christmas Child"

Operation Christmas Child, a program sponsored by the Samaritan’s Purse ministry, is once again underway at Regent University School of Law. 

The program seeks to bless the lives of underprivileged children across the globe by providing them with a shoebox of small gifts and the Gospel. Much more than a toy donation, the shoeboxes are much needed support for children that live in poor conditions and represent to each child that people haven’t forgotten them and that God loves them. 

At the law school’s November 3, 2011, chapel Jim Weaver, a local full-time volunteer for Samaritan’s Purse, reported that in 2010 Operation Christmas Child distributed shoeboxes to 8.2 million children in 109 countries. Since 1993, over 85 million shoe boxes have been donated and delivered worldwide.  According to Weaver, “The Gospel of the Lord Jesus Christ is in every box.”

The Moot Court Board will be collecting filled shoeboxes through November18th at numerous drop-off stations in Robertson Hall.

Shoeboxes can be individualized for a male or female child between the ages of 2 and 14. The contents of the box may include anything from toys and crayons to toothbrushes and candy that will not melt. (Toy guns or toys that represent violence are not permitted.) Donors are also suggested to include a picture of the donor’s family and a letter to the child.

Learn more about Operation Christmas Child here.

by Stephanie Hartman

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