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Faculty Highlight: Professor Bruce N. Cameron

Bruce Cameron, Reed Larson Professor of Labor Law, brings to the classroom a lifetime of experience working at the forefront of litigation surrounding compulsory unionism and Right to Work issues.

Cameron is a distinguished attorney with the National Right to Work Legal Defense Foundation and is widely considered a pioneer in the area of religious liberty for employees whose faith prohibits them from supporting labor unions. He focuses his professional and scholarly activities on advocating for religious and political freedom for employees of faith, a topic that continues to receive media attention.

Indeed, if recent developments in the State of Michigan’s legislature are any indication, students at Regent who are interested in right-to-work issues will have the privilege of studying with Cameron at a very exciting time in the history of Right to Work legislation.

In December 2012 Michigan Governor Rick Snyder signed into law Right to Work legislation that prohibits individuals from being forced to join a union or financially support a union to maintain employment and prohibits employers from firing them if they don’t join a union.

Cameron considers this a huge win for individuals who believe they should be free to choose whether to support a labor union.

“Unions are private institutions,” Cameron says. “A government should not compel you to join or financially support a private institution. If you love freedom, the passage of Michigan’s Right to Work law is a win. There is no contest for those who love freedom.”

At Regent, Cameron teaches Religion in the Workplace, Public Sector Labor Law and administers the Right to Work Practicum while adding to his list of numerous published articles on the topics of religion, Constitutional law, the rights of religious dissenters, and labor law.

Earlier this academic year he presented at both the Atlantic Union Attorney’s Conference and Pepperdine University School of Law on the topic of unreasonable religious accommodations in the workplace. He has appeared frequently on television and radio shows including appearances on Dr. Dobson’s Focus on the Family. During thirty years litigating religious freedom and constitutional law cases in the employment context, he never lost a Title VII religious accommodation case in court.

Learn more about Cameron here.

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