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Showing posts from November, 2014

Faculty Achievements: Week Ending November 21, 2014

Professor Eleanor Brown's article "Healing Healthcare Through Tax Reform" was cited in Nicholas Drew, Two Federally Subsidized Health Insurance Programs Are One Too Many: Reconsidering the Federal Income Tax Exclusion for Employer-Provided Health Insurance in Light of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, 54 B.C.L. Rev. 2047 (2013).

Professor James Davids has busy travelling overseas, including his participation in the Advocates Asia Conference.  Here’s a summary of some of his presentations:

"The First Amendment as an Example of Drawing Boundaries Between Church and State: Its Success and Failures," Universitas Kristen Indonesia, Jakarta, Indonesia (Oct. 30, 2014)"The Rule of Law in Theistic & Secular Democracies,"13th Annual Advocates Asia Conference, Jakarta, Indonesia (Oct. 31, 2014)"The Birth and Nurturing of Christian Legal Society Chapters on Local Campuses,"  13th Annual Advocates Asi…

Faculty Achievements: Week Ending November 14, 2014

Professors Eric DeGroffand Kathleen McKee's work on 'Learning' Like Lawyers: Addressing the Differences in Law Student Learning Styles has been cited in a recent article by St. Thomas University School of Law Professors Patricia W. Hatamyar Moore and Todd P. Sullivan in their piece called Active Learning and School Performance.

Professor James Duane's article, The Proper Pronunciation of Certiorari: The Supreme Court's Surprising Six-Way Split, has been downloaded 160 times, at least six of which have been by Supreme Court Justices who have wanted to know the proper pronunciation of the word and if they indeed have spoken it correctly. 
Professor Tessa Dysart is this week at the Annual Federalist Society Convention on Millennials, Equity and the Rule of Law, and she is hosting a panel of federal judges.

Professors Natt Ganttand Gloria Whittico published an article on student development and professional identity at page 6 of The Learning Curve.

Small-Town Girl Advocates in a Political World

Her name was Dekha Hassan-Mohamed.

As a Somali fleeing the nation for refusing a marriage proposal from a member of the Al-Shabaab—a violent Islamic sect that doesn't take kindly to subversion—her story sounds more like the beginnings of a dissonant fairy tale rather than the reality she and countless women in her home nation face.

After her brother was brutally murdered by Islamic extremists, Hassan-Mohamed escaped Somalia, making her way through Ethiopia, Brazil, and on to Mexico. She eventually reached the international bridge where she sought peace and safety in the United States, but was detained due to lack of identification.

"The problem is that in a country like Somalia there hasn't been a stable government in so long; and they're not exactly concerned with giving you a birth certificate," said Emily Arthur '15 (pictured), a third-year student in Regent University's School of Law.  Emily is also a graduate assistant, student staff member, and two…

First ODBA Reception Held at Regent University School of Law

On October 29, 2014, Old Dominion Bar Association (ODBA) held its first awareness and award reception at Regent University School of Law.

ODBA Judicial Members Marjorie Arrington, Tanya Bullock and Teresa Hammons, and ODBA members Clarence Brooks, Darius Davenport, Helivi Holland, Marcus Scriven and Karla Williams served on a panel and discussed their legal career choices and the benefits of being an ODBA member.

Students had a litany of questions and were excited about the opportunity to speak frankly with judges and lawyers. First year law student Natasha Delille won a drawing and received a $250 scholarship at the reception.

Special thanks goes to Sean Mitchell, a 3rd year law student and BLSA President, who coordinated the reception.

Story by ODBA