Skip to main content

Regent University School of Law Hosts the Fourth-Annual Global Justice Symposium

Benjamin Nolot.
Just a few weeks ago, box offices around the globe hit shattering records with the release of a blockbuster film celebrating sex as a form of submission and entertainment.

But on Saturday, Feb. 21, Regent University's Center for Global Justice, Human Rights, and the Rule of Law along with the Regent Journal of Global Justice and Public Policy, hosted the fourth annual Global Justice Symposium: Human Rights and the Sexualization of Culture.

The symposium featured panel discussions of leading experts who delved into the hyper-sexualized topics of the foundation of human rights; areas where there are certainly more than fifty shades of grey.

"It was incredibly relevant and timely content for the world today," said Ernie Walton '11 (School of Law), administrative director for the Center for Global Justice. "The world is talking about these issues, but not in the right way."

Walton explained that though these topics — such as pedophilia, and sexual slavery — are oftentimes taboo in the Christian sect, that shouldn't prohibit those with a biblical worldview from engaging in these important discussions.

"As soon as you change your sexual ethic and you have an 'anything goes' attitude toward sexuality, you don't know where the line is," said Walton. "We have to look at these issues from God's perspective."

Three panels explored topics in human rights: the sex as a business panel was led by Scott Alleman, assistant Commonwealth's attorney at the Virginia Beach Commonwealth's Attorney's Office; and Laila Mickelwait, manager of Policy and Public Affairs for Exodus Cry.

The foundation of human rights panel was led by Matthew Franck, director of the Willam E. and Carol G. Simon Center on Religion and the Constitution; and Jeffery Ventrella, senior counsel/senior vice-president of strategic training for the Alliance Defending Freedom.

Finally, the children as property discussion was led by Naomi Cahn, professor at George Washington University Law School; Jim Dwyer, professor at William & Mary School of Law; Arina Grossu, director for the Center on Human Dignity; and Lynne Marie Kohm, professor at Regent's School of Law.

The highlight for Walton, however, was learning that all is not lost in the battle of sex-trafficking from speaker Benjamin Nolot, founder and president of Exodus Cry. Nolot's anti-trafficking organization is dedicated to abolishing modern-day slavery and assisting survivors through their acclimation to life after being rescued.

"My primary goal is about the students," said Walton. "As they sit there and listen to the same topics but from different speakers, they're able to think about these issues critically. We want them to realize our worldview and how we look at these issues matter. It's all interconnected."

The discussions brought forth from the panel illustrated that though there is still major work to be done in these fields, there's hope for the future.

"There is a lot of legal work to be done, but first and foremost the battles we face regarding sex in today's culture are spiritual battles," said Walton. "Certainly something that everyone can do is to start praying to create long-term change."

Learn more about Regent University's School of Law and the Center for Global Justice, Human Rights, and the Rule of Law.

By Brett Wilson | February 25, 2015

Popular posts from this blog

Regent Law Trains Lawyers Called to Fight for Social Justice

As Regional Legal Coordinator with Freedom Firm in Maharashtra, India, Evan Henck ‘07 helps unravel the complex legal and social difficulties that come with prosecuting sex trafficking.
Evan’s virtual journal entry below depicts the sobering reality of the sex trade even as it celebrates the Freedom Firm’s recent progress. It originally appeared in the 2010 Spring/Summer edition of “Brief Remark”, Regent University School of Law’s new biannual publication.
From giving papers at a national human rights conferences and training human rights attorneys, to subsidizing summer internships within the nascent Center for Global Justice, the Regent Law community is committed to furthering the cause of justice at home and abroad.
If you feel called to the legal profession and to the fight for social justice, a Regent J.D. might be for you. Learn more here.

Jan. 16 2010
Maharashtra, India
In January an informant phoned Suresh Pawar, a human rights activist with the Freedom Firm in Maharashtra, India,…

Congresswoman Michele Bachmann Speaks at Regent Law Chapel

Raising nearly 30 children has provided Minnesota Congresswoman Michele Bachmann with negotiating skills that serve her well in the nation's capital. Bachmann, a passionate advocate for foster care and adoption, visited Regent University on November 20 as part of the university's recognition of National Adoption Awareness Month.

Bachmann and her husband, Dr. Marcus Bachmann, are the parents of five biological children and 23 foster children. She shared their story as parents and also their connection to Regent during a special law chapel for students, faculty and staff.

"It's been a marvelous experience for us. Being foster parents has allowed us to teach our biological kids that they're not the only kids in the world," Bachmann said. "Our foster care kids have been able to see what a picture of an imperfect 'normal' family is like. And we saw the beauty and worth in them.

"Twenty-three times, we've seen these kids graduate from high sc…

Regent Law Dean Appointed to Board of Governors of the Virginia Bar Association

On Saturday, January 21, the Virginia Bar Association (VBA) inaugurated its statewide representatives for their 2017 term.

Regent University School of Law (LAW) Dean Michael Hernandez was among those new leaders as he accepted his appointment as a representative by the Board of Governors of the VBA.

Hernandez will represent law schools on the VBA board for a minimum of a one-year term. He is the first Regent LAW faculty member to be appointed to this distinction.


“It is an honor to serve as the sole law school representative on the Board of Governors and a privilege to be a part of this accomplished group of prominent attorneys.  I am excited to work with the other Board members to build on and continue the standard of excellence that the VBA has upheld since it was founded in 1888,” said Hernandez.

“The other members of the Board of Governors are the most accomplished lawyers in Virginia, and the Board is collegial and committed to the highest standards of professionalism,” …