Regent Law Student Donates Part of Her Liver to Five-Year-Old Stranger

Molly Bricker (right) visits with Sage and Sage's mother
after surgery. Photo courtesy of A Liver for Sage
Facebook page.
 
It was just a regular day at the nail salon. Molly Bricker, a rising 2L in Regent University's School of Law, was in the midst of her very first round of challenging finals in December 2014. She sat with her friend waiting among the colorful splashes of nail polish when a news story on the salon's television screen caught her eye:

The little girl’s name was Sage, a five-year-old from Portsmouth, Virginia, who was diagnosed with a rare form of leukemia as an infant – and in dire need of a new liver. Her early illness required a bone marrow transplant, rendering her blood type different from the rest of her family.

Bricker was struck. "I remember thinking, 'This little girl is so cute, and so small and so happy,'" said Bricker. "I didn't even know you could donate a portion of your liver. But in that moment God made it really clear that I had to do something."

Bricker spent the next hour before her exam on the phone, discerning whether she'd be a blood-type match and beginning the donor application process. Bricker was later notified several others were ahead of her on the list, so she began making plans to spend her summer months bolstering her legal career with a prestigious clerkship. She thought she was "off the hook."

But her story wouldn't end there. "I'd almost forgotten about it when they told me I was on the top of the donor list," said Bricker.

Recalling how strongly she felt when she first learned Sage's story, Bricker moved forward with testing in early June to see if she was a match. Tests on Monday, June 1, proved she was. Her surgery would be that Thursday. Surgery and recovery meant she needed to turn down the summer clerkship.

"The week before the surgery, God was constantly reminding me that He was in control," said Bricker. "I tend to need a schedule, I need a routine. So, I was shocked by my lack of anxiety I had throughout the process, which I 100 percent attribute to God."

So, what is it that prompts a first-year law student to start the organ donation process during finals week? Bricker attributes it to nothing other than God's conviction. "It was definitely a challenge, but because I felt so sure that this was what the Lord wanted me to do, I just trusted that He would sustain me," said Bricker.

Sage is now in recovery, supported by a portion of Bricker's liver that will continue to grow as she does. Bricker's own liver is expected to heal to its full size within the next few months as she recovers with her family in Massachusetts.

"Every day I'm feeling better," she said, explaining her recovery process has entailed eating lots of protein – specifically hamburgers." The body craves what it needs, I guess. I'm a hungry, hungry person," Bricker said with a laugh. Bricker experienced a hunger for something much more than burgers, though. She's experienced a hunger for justice and God's sovereignty.

Her story has been told by several local and national news organizations. But whether she's entertaining an interview with the local news or People Magazine, her humble, yet convicting takeaway is seamless.

"Anybody who's asked about my experience, I've just wanted them to hear about God's sovereignty. He's the only reason I applied, and the only reason the surgery was successful," said Bricker. "Everyone who writes about this needs to know that God is the focal point, that's all I really want."

By Brett Wilson Tubbs | July 6, 2015

Regent Law Adds New M.A. in Law Concentrations

Seek justice. Encourage the oppressed. Plead the case of the orphan and the widow.

These charges to believers and the growing interest in global justice spurred Regent University's School of Law to develop new concentrations in Human Rights and General Legal Studies for its Master of Arts in Law (M.A.) program, launching Fall 2015.

Both of these 30-credit hour programs are designed for adult learners seeking to enhance their careers in fields such as business, human resources, criminal justice, national security and non-profit management.

The concentration in General Legal Studies will include courses in Christian Foundations of Law, American Legal System & Writing, with the opportunity for students to complete 24 credits in one or more M.A. in Law concentrations. The Human Rights concentration will train graduate students in areas such as child advocacy, national security and international law.

"There are few law schools that have the same breadth of concentrations that Regent offers, and offer quality online education," said James Davids, associate law professor and director of Regent Law’s L.L.M. and M.A. programs. "Regent has more M.A. in Law courses and students than any other law school in the country. This entrepreneurial education should be attractive to anyone who wants to advance their resume and career with a quality, practical degree."

Davids explained that these two new programs were created with the acknowledgement that students want to follow their own path to academic success. These programs will allow them to do just that.

Regent began the M.A. in Law program during Fall 2014, and currently enrolls more than 100 students.

"We seeks students with academic gifts, passion and time to graduate successfully from these programs," said Davids. "If someone has the ability to succeed, plus the drive and passion for human rights in general, then we want to help them reach their calling through the human rights program."

Learn more about Regent University's School of Law and the Master of Arts in Law.

Regent University Ranked in 2015 Legal Publication

In its spring 2015 edition, The National Jurist, a publication for aspiring law students, listed Regent University School of Law among schools such as Duke University, Wake Forrest University and Syracuse University as having highly effective practical training in the legal fields.

The National Jurist also listed Regent as among 33 schools in the nation for its stellar bar exam preparation, listing its 80.91 percent bar pass rate among its competitors such as the University of Virginia, Penn State Law, and Baylor University.

Read the full National Jurist article.

"These objective measures validate the excellence of our curriculum, faculty and students. A school cannot excel without excellent students, and we are blessed with a quality student body. Our curriculum does an exceptional job of preparing our students both substantively and practically to excel in the practice of law," said Michael Hernandez, dean of Regent's School of Law.

Programs within the school, such as the university's moot court competition teams and the Center for Human Rights, Global Justice, and the Rule of Law, along with proximity and access to the American Center for Law and Justice (ACLJ), contribute to Regent's consistent ability to provide students with ample courtroom and writing experience before they are launched into the legal field.

This year's Moot Court program finished 8th in the nation. Students who attend law school at Regent are assured that they are receiving the best education in and out of the classroom, a fact that Hernandez does not take for granted.

"Our faculty has stellar credentials and has been ranked for two consecutive years in the top 10 in Princeton Review surveys of American law students. I am blessed to lead a team of such exceptional people, supported by excellent programs," said Hernandez.

Learn more about Regent University School of Law.

By Brett Wilson | June 25, 2015

Regent Law's Wealth Management and Financial Planning Program Renewed

Regent University launched its M.A. in Law program in the fall of 2014. A year later, Dr. M.G. “Pat” Robertson saw the need for a Wealth Man...