Visiting Professor Assists School of Law Students With Passing the Bar Exam

When it comes to his life, visiting professor Wade Berryhill has, what he calls, a simple mission statement:

“When God says to do something, I say, ‘yes,’” said Berryhill.

He’s followed this route, from entering law school at the University of Arkansas, through his career as a trial attorney and his 37 years of teaching at the University of Richmond. Now, he adds Regent University to the list.

Visiting Professor Wade Berryhill
“I didn’t have any doubt the day Dean [Michael] Hernandez called,” said Berryhill. “I said a quick prayer and realized this is where I needed to be.”

He was tapped to teach Contracts to first-year law students. But most of his day-to-day on campus involves mentoring an estimated 10 to 15 students, guiding them through everything from what courses to take to how to pass the bar exam.

This is how Berryhill approaches many endeavors in his life. He senses a pull. A yearning. It results in a life inspired by calling, rather than ambition. And he encourages his students to search for the same.

“A driven person is often miserable. But if you’re called, there’s a comfort in knowing that. I claim the Scriptures that God doesn’t call you to do the things you’re not qualified to do,” said Berryhill. “Moses probably had a serious stutter, but God called him to deliver a whole nation. Sometimes we’re stretched to the limit, but nevertheless we have the ability.”

According to Berryhill, for law graduates, taking the bar examination is such a stretch. For many, it pushes the limits of anxiety, and not without reason.

“It’s a gateway to their career,” said Berryhill. His advice to Regent students is to schedule and compartmentalize their lives.

“When you study, study. And when you have family time or play time, do that,” said Berryhill. “Don’t be doing one halfway while thinking about the other.”

Berryhill’s educated advice comes from teaching bar exam courses and more than 30 years of “sitting at the table” post-bar exam, discussing test answers with other selected law professors. Over the years, he’s tutored countless students – he estimates close to 10,000 – in bar exam preparation in Virginia.

And of course, he’s had first-hand experience taking the exam himself.

“I took it seriously, but I didn’t stress,” said Berryhill. “I had worked very hard in law school and was confidence in my ability. Plus, I have a deep and abiding faith as I’m able to have. I wouldn’t say it was pleasant,” said Berryhill. “But in the grand scheme of difficult things I’ve had to do in my life, it wasn’t in the top-ten by any means.”

Berryhill entered law school shortly after his tenure as a pilot in the United States Navy during the Vietnam War. A feat which put the pressures of law school and the bar exam into a healthy perspective. Looking back on his life, he can see how everything from his advanced law degree from Colombia University to his trial work has led to the work he does preparing his “energetic” students today.

“I really enjoy the students, and when the light catches on and I can see it in their eyes, I feel good,” said Berryhill. “And I love the feeling as much now as the day I started.”

Learn more about Regent University’s School of Law.

By Brett Wilson Tubbs | February 18, 2016

Regent Law Faculty Achievements - Week of February 15, 2016

Regent University's School of Law Faculty members willingly share their knowledge and expertise beyond the classroom to spark scholarly debate and advance the practice of law. Their latest endeavors include the following.

Regent Law Library Director Margaret Christensen and Assistant Director Marie Hamm have been selected for possible inclusion in An Oral History of Law Librarianship, part of the Spinelli’s Reference Shelf library on HeinOnline. Patrick Kehoe, former president of the American Association of Law Libraries will be on campus next Wednesday to conduct their video interviews for this honor.  Decisions on which videos to include in the library, and when they will appear are in the hands of a Hein editorial board, but interviews are available to anyone with HeinOnline library access, which includes almost all U.S. and Canadian law school communities, and a lesser number of law firm, county and courthouse law library users, providing great exposure to Regent University School of Law Library.

Marie Hamm
, assistant director of the Regent Law Library, will also be a guest speaker at Cornell University in April, and will present “Less is the New More.”

Professor Eric DeGroff will be presenting on April 9 at the Legal Educators’ Colloquium, “Help!  I’ve Been Asked to Teach my ADR Course Online!”  The Colloquium is part of the ABA Section of the Dispute Resolution Annual Spring Conference. Other panelists will include colleagues from Michigan State, Hamline & Creighton.

Associate Professor Bradley Jacob will be speaking on Tuesday, March 8 at the University of Nebraska Law School on "Hobby Lobby Revisited: Obamacare v. The Little Sisters of the Poor."  Then, on Wednesday, March 9, he will present "The Senate's Duty to Advise and Consent . . . Or Not" at the University of Missouri-Columbia Law School.

Professor Craig Stern will be speaking at the New England School of Law in Boston Federalist Society event on February 19. He will present “Christian Views on Moral Luck,” largely based on his article, "Crime, Moral Luck, and the Sermon on the Mount."

Professor James Duane
will be speaking at Stanford Law in April.

Associate Dean Ben Madison and Professor Natt Gantt, and their work on identify formation and the Center for Ethical Formation and Legal Education Reform (CEFLER) were featured on the Law Professors Blog in a post authored by Hofstra law professor Scott Fruehwald, a leader in the field of identity formation and author of a book on professional identity formation in law.
 
Professor Jeff Brauch led a retreat for law students and lawyers this past weekend hosted by the Christian Legal Society (and Mike Schutt) for their CLS Northeast Retreat held in upstate NY.  Jeff spoke on “Following God in a Pluralistic World” to about 30 students (most from NYU) and approximately 10 lawyers.

Regent Law Faculty Achievements - Week of February 8, 2016

Regent University's School of Law Faculty members willingly share their knowledge and expertise beyond the classroom to spark scholarly debate and advance the practice of law. Their latest endeavors include the following.

Assistant Professor Tessa Dysart presented at Campbell Law School on a trafficking panel moderated by the state’s Lt. Gov., and at the Savannah Law School Federalist Society on the topic of human trafficking.  You can find her impactful work on this area of law at The Protected Innocence Initiative: Building Protective State Law Regimes for America’s Sex-Trafficked Children and at Child, Victim, or Prostitute? Justice Through Immunity for Prostituted Children.

Professor James Duane
was on Channel 3 on Monday night, February 1. View the "Watch Your Words: Should You Talk to the Police?" news clip here.

Professor Natt Gantt was interviewed in The Virginian-Pilot's article regarding Portsmouth Councilman Bill Moody. View the article here.  Professor Gantt also got some great responses from a recent presentation titled "Leadership Development for Law Students" at the Fourth Annual Educating Tomorrow's Lawyers (ETL) Conference in Denver, Colorado. Professor Gantt's presentation focused on defining leadership, explaining the need for leadership education in law schools, and identifying specific initiatives Regent Law has implemented to promote leadership development among its students.  "Many leaders in this country are lawyers," said Professor Gantt. "Yet law schools have traditionally focused very little on how they can prepare students for these leadership roles. As law schools devote more instruction on the skills that are important for professional success, we as legal educators need to do more to help our students understand the skills and attributes of effective leaders."  Watch Professor Gantt's presentation online »

Associate Dean Ben Madison authored a blog post on formative assessments for Best Practices for Legal Education. His worked received collegial praise in this comment posted below the blog: “Professor Madison has a great idea here. Students get feedback by engaging in a low burden, practical exercise that also teaches them things they need to know for their final exams, yet the professor’s burden is relatively small. I do feel compelled to add that this approach to formative feedback is one of Professor Madison’s many great ideas for improving legal education.” 

Professor Craig Stern’s "Mens Rea and Mental Disorder" paper was recently listed on SSRN's Top Ten download list for: Criminal Law eJournal. 

Associate Professor Bradley P. Jacob’s paper,
"The Bible and the Constitution," was recently listed on SSRN's Top Ten download list for: CRN: History (Christianity).

Regent Law has improved its position in the SSRN rankings, moving from #128 to #124, up nearly 1,000 downloads in one month – and just 2,000 downloads out of the top 100.  This increase was largely due to increased traffic to Professor James Duane’s page in downloads for his work at The Extraordinary Trajectory of Griffin v. California: The Aftermath of Playing Fifty Years of Scrabble with the Fifth Amendment, and at The Right to Remain Silent: A New Answer to an Old Question.

Both Professor Eric DeGroff and Janis Kirkland, director of Regent Law's Wealth Management concentration in the M.A. program, contribute regularly to two commercial environmental publications. Professor DeGroff is the managing editor of the Chemical Waste Litigation Reporter and a monthly contributor to the EPA Administrative Law Reporter. Ms. Kirkland is a regular author for both publication, which are published twice a month, online. They feature short articles of current interest and summaries of all significant federal environmental case decisions, covering the Clean Air Act, Clean Water Act, Safe Drinking Water Act, Superfund, the Resource Conservation & Recovery Act, and other laws.


Be sure to mark your calendar and register for the Center for Global Justice 5th Annual Symposium, Women's Rights: 50 Years After Griswold v. Connecticut to be held March 4th, 2016. This event includes two panel discussions, a two-credit ethics CLE, luncheon and a banquet with featured speaker Abby Johnson, former director of a Planned Parenthood clinic and now prominent pro-life advocate. Presidential candidate Carly Fiorina has also been invited to speak. For more information on the conference, the CLE and to register, visit the Center for Global Justice website

Regent's School of Law Teams Make Waves in Start of Moot Court Competitions

The game is strong for Regent University’s School of Law (LAW) 2016 Moot Court competition teams.

Each January, the top 16 Moot Court programs in the United States are invited to participate in the annual Andrews Kurth Moot Court National Championship at the University of Houston. Regent was selected to participate after being ranked 8th in the nation by the University of Houston Law Center at the conclusion of the 2015 competition season.
Price Media Law Moot Court Team.
Photo courtesy of Christy Hurst.

During the competition January 28-29, students Renee Knudsen, Palmer Horst, and Marie Dienhart defended their way to second-place in the nation, just behind Georgetown as they competed with teams from schools such as Southern Methodist University, New York University and Texas Tech University. The Regent team also took home the award for best brief.

The team was coached by LAW dean, Michael Hernandez.

“The success of our teams is a testimony to the purpose and quality of a Regent Law education. Moot court competitions test the primary essential skills of lawyering—analytical ability, legal research, persuasive writing and speaking, teamwork, and advocating for a client under pressure,” said Hernandez. “These achievements reflect that the quality of the skills training and legal education provided by Regent Law stands out in the U.S. and around the world.”

Continuing the streak, Christy Hurst, Palmer Hurst and Sandra Alcaide won first place at Regional Rounds in the Americas of the Price Media Law Moot Court Competition in New York City this past weekend.

The team, coached by LAW professor Jeffrey Brauch, won the best brief, and Alcaide earned the marks for best oral advocate. This is the second year in a row that a team from Regent has swept the competition.

“Advancing to the international rounds is a tremendous honor. We know we’ll be up against the best in the world, which is an exciting opportunity, but still a daunting challenge,” said C. Hurst. “Looking back at all of our hard work, it is satisfying to know that it was well worth all of the time spent! It is also a testament to God’s blessing of our preparation that we are able to continue to Oxford. I saw His hand at every step of the way as he walked us through the rounds this week! From giving our team the side we wanted to argue in each round to removing potential obstacles, we were tremendously blessed.”

They will advance to the international championship rounds of the competition at Oxford University March 30-April 2nd, the same competition where Regent’s team placed second in the world in 2013.

Additionally, the team did a home-turf victory lap on Monday, February 1, making an appearance on the Christian Broadcasting Network’s 700 Club. Watch the interview here.

“I was very proud watching the Regent team compete this weekend. Palmer Hurst and Sandra Alcaide competed at a very high level and grew stronger by the round. Their diligent preparation combined with their natural giftedness made them a powerful team. I was also proud of the work the entire team – Sandra, Palmer, and Christy Hurst – did on the memorials (written arguments),” said Brauch. “To win the Best Memorial for the entire Western Hemisphere is a tremendous accomplishment. We praise God for his grace! And we are excited to compete for the world championship in Oxford next month.”

Learn more about Regent University’s School of Law.

By Brett Wilson Tubbs | February 1, 2016

Regent Law Faculty Achievements - Week of February 1, 2016

Regent University's School of Law Faculty members willingly share their knowledge and expertise beyond the classroom to spark scholarly debate and advance the practice of law. Their latest endeavors include the following.

In December of 2015, Professor James Duane published a short essay, "The Extraordinary Trajectory of Griffin v. California: The Aftermath of Playing Fifty Years of Scrabble with the Fifth Amendment," with Stanford’s online Criminal Law Journal, available here on SSRN.  Connected to that piece and another article by Professor Duane on Fifth Amendment privileges (view here), this 3-minute video had been online for only two days and was viewed almost 5 million times.  It has now been viewed more than 8.5 million times.  Furthermore, this story at The Blaze provides a nice summary of the synergy of these events, all from scholarship and teaching well integrated.  This has made a great increase in our SSRN downloads as you can see from the right hand side of this chart, and being number one on the following SSRN Top Download lists:

  • Evidence & Evidentiary Procedure eJournal
  • Criminal Procedure eJournal
  • Law & Society: Criminal Procedure eJournal

His article also placed second on the Criminal Law & Procedures eJournal list!  Well done, Professor Duane.

Professor James Duane also was recently interviewed on CBN News regarding the Center for Medical Progress’ grand jury indictment of the Planned Parenthood investigative journalist videos on fetal tissue harvesting and sales. View the interview here.

Assistant Professor Tessa Dysart’s article, The Origination Clause, the Affordable Care Act, and Indirect Constitutional Violations, that she presented to us at a fall Law Library Faculty Colloquium event, was cited in the amicus brief, Association of American Physicians and Surgeons, found here. Assistant Professor Dysart also appeared on local TV at the request of WVEC reporter Mike Gooding regarding the Supreme Court's initial lack of action on the McDonnell appeal. View it here.

Professor Craig Stern’s article paper, "Mens Rea and Mental Disorder," was recently listed on SSRN's Top Ten download list for Criminal Law eJournal, and LSN: Criminal Offenses & Defenses (Sub-Topic).

Associate Professor Kathleen McKee’s latest article, a book review on An Alternative to "Business as Usual?" Evangelical Christian Executives: A New Model for Business Corporations by Lewis D. Solomon. New Brunswick, J.J.: Transaction Publishers. 2004. pp. 177, will soon be published and posted at SSRN.  And, many of you were present at the Law Library Faculty Colloquium Tuesday January 26, when Associate Professor McKee and Associate Dean Lynne Marie Kohm presented their article on "Sustainable Development, Family, and Human Trafficking." They will also be presenting this research at Christopher Newport University’s Global Conference on Women in March.

The next Law Library Faculty Colloquium will feature Associate Professor Gloria Whittico. More information.

Center for Global Justice Administrative Director Ernie Walton’s blog on children’s rights was picked up by CNSNews.com's commentary section found here.

Professor Natt Gantt and Associate Dean Lynne Marie Kohm will be presenting in the final plenary session of the annual Nootbaar Conference at Pepperdine on Doing No Harm.

Be sure to mark your calendar and register for the Center for Global Justice 5th Annual Symposium, Women's Rights: 50 Years After Griswold v. Connecticut to be held March 4th, 2016. This event includes two panel discussions, a two-credit ethics CLE, luncheon and a banquet with featured speaker Abby Johnson, former director of a Planned Parenthood clinic and now prominent pro-life advocate. Presidential candidate Carly Fiorina has also been invited to speak. For more information on the conference, the CLE and to register, visit the Center for Global Justice website

Alumni Profile: Allen Anjo (Class of 2013)

Allen Anjo (Law, RSG '13)

Allen Anjo (RSG, Law ’13) and his wife, Julie, are missionaries and Legal Advisors to Youth With A Mission (YWAM), a missions organization that currently works in over 1,100 locations in more than 180 countries to send volunteer missionaries around the world to share the gospel of Jesus Christ. Allen and Julie are part of the General Counsel’s office at the YWAM base in Kona, Hawaii, and are about to launch a School of, Advocacy, Law and Justice which will provide training in legal advocacy to missionaries who are passionate about seeing the justice of God come to the “least of these” throughout the world.


Allen is originally from the small province of Nagaland in northeastern India, and he came to the United States in 2000 to pursue a Bachelor’s degree in business and computer science. The Lord then called  him to attend Liberty University in western Virginia. He said, “That is where I met Julie; she was among the inaugural class of the law school there. I got a Master’s of Religion in missiology and a Master’s of Divinity in apologetics. She graduated in 2007, I finished in 2008, and we got married in 2009.” Julie had done a Discipleship Training School (DTS) with YWAM and received her Bachelors in Biblical Studies with YWAM’s University of the Nations. During a mission trip in Burma she heard the people’s stories of injustice and oppression and she felt the Lord speaking to her saying, “Be my voice for the voiceless.” This is what led her to go to law school.

With a shared passion for missions and fighting injustice, Allen and Julie came to Regent University in 2010 so Allen could pursue dual degrees from the Robertson School of Government and the School of Law. As Allen worked on his M.A. in Government and his Juris Doctorate, Julie began working as Assistant Director of Admissions and Financial Aid in the School of Law. In 2013, as Allen was finishing up his degree, their son Samuel was born, Allen was interning at the Virginia Beach Commonwealth Attorney’s office, and a settled future in Virginia was beginning to look promising. Allen reflected on this time and said, “At that point, I was on track to become a prosecutor and there was an opportunity for Julie to apply for the directorship. God spoke to Julie at that time and said, “You are on track right now for a good life here. Do you want that, or do you want to live life with Me as I would design it?” This was a major decision point for them, and they knew there was sacrifice on the other side, but they decided to ask God what else he might have for them. He simply told them to quit their jobs, and He would show them what was next.



Not long after, they became aware of the need for full-time legal advisors at the Kona base in Hawaii and knew it was what God had been preparing them for. So they sold their possessions, packed their bags, and made the move to Hawaii. Allen said, “Suddenly it dawned on us what God had been doing in giving us this education over the last 13 years. He gave us these experiences to prepare us for this job we were going into.”



Now they provide advice to the base in a broad range of legal matters and are getting ready to launch the School of Advocacy, Law, and Justice this July. “Our desire is to equip missionaries to identify injustice, be advocates for the people suffering, and bring God’s love and freedom  to them. The hope is that the school will  eventually become a  course in a degree program  for an Associate’s, Bachelor’s, or Master’s degree through YWAM’s University of the Nations.” They are also developing plans to lead and send teams internationally to travel into the context of injustice and learn the key issues and practical steps for advocacy and legal action in specific situations. In all of this, their personal mission is: “Going into the world with law and justice for the least of these.” Though they have to raise all of their own support and have lived largely out of a suitcase for the last year-and-a-half, Allen said, “When we look at the potential of the work we are doing to impact other people, we are encouraged by the knowledge that we are able to better the lives of other people.” Not only that, but they are getting to enjoy some of the best years of their son Samuel’s life, and are expecting a baby girl in September 2016. If you would like to keep up with the Anjo’s ministry, check out their blog at this link.

Regent Law's Wealth Management and Financial Planning Program Renewed

Regent University launched its M.A. in Law program in the fall of 2014. A year later, Dr. M.G. “Pat” Robertson saw the need for a Wealth Man...