5.12.2017

Regent Faculty and Alumni Participate in Virginia Beach’s National Day of Prayer Observance



Prayer is a vital part of the Regent University community, and on Thursday, May 4, several Regent professors and alumni participated in a National Day of Prayer observance at City Hall in Virginia Beach, Virginia.

Distinguished Professor and Associate Dean of the School of Law (LAW) Patricia L. West was the coordinator for this annual event. Although West has participated in the ceremony previously, this year marked her first time in the role of coordinator, a position she looks forward to continuing in the future.

Other Regent-connected participants included Dr. Joseph Umidi, executive vice president for student life, who served as master of ceremony; Dean Michael Hernandez (LAW), who offered remarks and prayed for the education system; former Virginia Governor Robert F. McDonnell ’89 (LAW and GOV), who prayed for local, state and national leaders; and Bishop B. Courtney McBath ’98 (DIV), pastor of Calvary Revival Church in Norfolk, who prayed for houses of worship.

“Regent contributes much to the Virginia Beach community, through our employees, alumni and students who live, work and volunteer here,” said West. “We believe in the power of prayer and it’s our privilege to join our friends in the community to support the National Day of Prayer observance.”

Also, Reverend Joel Palser, chaplain of the Christian Broadcasting Network, prayed for the media. Other elements of the service included reading of a Mayor’s proclamation, prayers for the military and business community, and musical performances featuring local school students and others. 


By Mindy Hughes

Regent University’s School of Law’s LL.M. Programs Given A+ Ranking by The International Jurist


In May 2017, The International Jurist released its latest issue featuring the best LL.M. programs. Regent University’s School of Law (LAW) received an “A+” ranking in its “Best Value Law Schools” category.

The issue honors “the most robust programs for foreign attorneys” in the areas of Academics, Best Law School, Experience, Career Opportunities and Best Value. Regent’s LL.M. programs were ranked above law schools such as UNC School of Law, Wake Forest University, Georgia State University and Ohio State University.

“I’m very proud of the Regent faculty, because they worked very hard to achieve that goal,” said director of LL.M. programs and LAW associate professor Kathleen McKee. “It’s nice to be able to say to them, ‘I know you worked hard, but here are the fruits of your labor.’”

The LL.M. programs – which include both American Legal Studies and Human Rights – are designed for students who have already received JDs and wish to pursue more concentrated areas of study.

The American Legal Studies program is an online, on-campus or hybrid concentration of study geared for graduates of accredited law institutions outside the United States who are fulfilling requirements to practice American law. The LL.M. in Human Rights is offered exclusively on campus, providing a biblical focus of study for those seeking advanced learning in international, regional and domestic human rights.

The rankings for “Best Value” considered whether LL.M. students could participate in law journals, the typical foreign student enrollment, percentage of students receiving a scholarship, and room and board costs for one year.

Apart from the “value” of the LL.M. programs as distinguished by The International Jurist, McKee believes their true worth is found in the credentials of the faculty and the rigor of the courses themselves.

McKee explained that for the area of American Legal Studies in particular, she witnesses faculty members going above and beyond helping students succeed, especially those seeking an education from outside of the United States. And while McKee said the superior ranking of her programs is an honor, she gives credit where it’s due:

“It’s really not about me,” she said. “It’s about the fact that I work with an incredible group of faculty.”

By Brett Wilson Tubbs

1.24.2017

Regent Law Dean Appointed to Board of Governors of the Virginia Bar Association

On Saturday, January 21, the Virginia Bar Association (VBA) inaugurated its statewide representatives for their 2017 term.

Dean Michael Hernandez

Regent University School of Law (LAW) Dean Michael Hernandez was among those new leaders as he accepted his appointment as a representative by the Board of Governors of the VBA.

Hernandez will represent law schools on the VBA board for a minimum of a one-year term. He is the first Regent LAW faculty member to be appointed to this distinction.


“It is an honor to serve as the sole law school representative on the Board of Governors and a privilege to be a part of this accomplished group of prominent attorneys.  I am excited to work with the other Board members to build on and continue the standard of excellence that the VBA has upheld since it was founded in 1888,” said Hernandez.

“The other members of the Board of Governors are the most accomplished lawyers in Virginia, and the Board is collegial and committed to the highest standards of professionalism,” he continued. “It was humbling to be chosen to serve in this role.  When I first began practicing law 30 years ago, I never imagined I would be given this honor one day.”

The VBA is the first statewide and largest voluntary organization for lawyers in the Commonwealth of Virginia. Its members are active in promoting legislation before the Virginia General Assembly.

Made up of about 5,000 members, it seeks to “advance the highest ideals of the profession through advocacy and volunteer service,” according to an official news release from the organization.

Learn more about Regent University’s School of Law.

By Brett W. Tubbs

1.19.2017

Regent Law Faculty Achievements - Week of January 19, 2017

Regent University's School of Law Faculty members willingly share their knowledge and expertise beyond the classroom to spark scholarly debate and advance the practice of law. Their latest endeavors include the following.

Law Library Assistant Director Marie Summerlin Hamm’s Book Review "Stop Telling and Start Showing: Show, Don't Tell: Legal Writing for the Real World by Adam Lamparello & Megan E. Boyd," was recently listed on SSRN's Top Ten download list for:

  • LSN: Book Reviews (Sub-Topic)
  • LSN: Practice of Law Librarianship (Topic)
  • RCRN: Writing Across the Curriculum (Topic)
  • Rhetoric Educator: Communication, Composition, Rhetoric, & Writing eJournal. 
She also did a review of The Complete Legal Writer (Carolina Academic Press), published in 108 Law Lib. J. 660 (Fall 2016).  The book, written by a couple of legal writing professors at UNC, explains their unique “genre discovery” approach to teaching legal writing.  The authors were so pleased with her review, that one blogged about it - Katie Rose Guest Pyral, one of the authors, posted a response to the book review on her blog. 

Director Janis Kirkland has recently published several case summaries in several journals including the EPA Administrative Law Reporter, the Securities Reform Act Litigation Reporter, Bank & Corporate Governance Law Reporter, the RICO & Securities Fraud Law Reporter, the EPA Administrative Law Reporter, the Chemical Waste Litigation Reporter, and the Securities Reform Act Litigation Reporter

Assistant Director Hamm and Director Kirkland, and Assistant Dean Kimberly Van Essendelft presented at the Legal Writing Institute’s One-Day Workshop at Wake Forest in December. The assistant director of that LAWR program sent Dean Hernandez a letter praising their work.

Associate Dean Natt Gantt and Professor Ben Madison’s paper, "Is There a Paradox Between Ethics and Happiness? Moral Formation for Lawyers," was recently listed on SSRN's Top Ten download list for: LSN: Law Firms/Legal Practice (Topic).  


Professor Eric DeGroff’s book chapter, “Access to Information: international perspective,” has just been published in Decision Making in Environmental Law, by Paddock, Glicksman, & Bryner.  The book is one volume of a two-volume encyclopedia covering environmental regulation and the environmental decision making process in the United States and internationally.

Carol Daugherty Rasnic, one of our fall adjunct professors, published "What the German Bundestag might have learned from the U.S. Congress on workers' right to strike." 


Associate Dean Lynne Marie Kohm's piece co-authored with Sandra Alcaide (’16) “Obergefell: A Game-changer for Women," was recently listed on SSRN's Top Ten download list for: Sexuality & the Law eJournal, among others. 


Professor Craig Stern’s downloads on SSRN have now eclipsed 1,550, led by "The Heart of Mens Rea and the Insanity of Psychopaths."

Distinguished Professor Harry Hutchison’s downloads are about to hit 4,100. View his work.


Professor James Duane’s downloads are nearly at 2,650, led by "The Right to Remain Silent: A New Answer to an Old Question" which has 1,239 downloads after being posted for just eight months.
 

12.21.2016

Regent Law Posts Excellent 2016 Bar Passage Rates


Congratulations to the Regent Law Class of 2016 for outstanding bar passage rates! The following results are from the July 2016 Bar Exam.

Regent Law graduates earned a 100% bar passage rate in Connecticut, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Minnesota, Missouri, North Carolina, New York, Texas, Washington, Wisconsin and Wyoming.

Additionally, they earned a 90% bar passage rate in the Uniform Bar Exam, which has been adopted in 26 states. This allows the graduates to potentially be licensed to practice law in all 26 states, which include: Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Colorado, Connecticut, District of Columbia, Idaho, Iowa, Kansas, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Dakota, Oregon, South Carolina, Utah, Vermont, Washington, West Virginia and Wyoming.


For all U.S. bar exams across the country, Regent Law Class of 2016 earned an 82.3% bar passage rate, outperforming the 2015 national average of 59%. 

In Virginia, Regent Law earned an 81.8% bar passage rate, outperforming the state average of 73%. 




12.12.2016

Regent Law Faculty Achievements -- Week of December 12, 2016

Regent University's School of Law Faculty members willingly share their knowledge and expertise beyond the classroom to spark scholarly debate and advance the practice of law. Their latest endeavors include the following.

The addition of Distinguished Professor Harry Hutchison to our ranks, as well as our continuous work marketing our scholarship, our ranking in SSRN has moved up to 127 from 130, surpassing Richmond, even with our very small faculty.  Download some of Professor Hutchison’s publications. Also download his most recent publication from the Harvard J. L. & Pol’y Hobby Lobby, Corporate Law, and Unsustainable Liberalism: A Reply to Judge Strine.

Professor James Duane’s piece The Right to Remain Silent: A New Answer to an Old Question has been downloaded a landmark 1,149 times, and he will be presenting at our Regent Law Faculty Colloquium Series brought to you by the Regent University Law Library, on January 24, 2016.

Professor Lou Hensler will be presenting at our Regent Law Faculty Colloquium Series brought to you by the Regent University Law Library, on February 28, 2016. 

Assistant Dean Kim Van Essendelft, Law Library Assistant Director Marie Hamm, and Principal Lecturer Janis Kirkland made a presentation about our developing assessment program today at the Legal Writing Institute One-Day Conference at Wake Forest University School of Law.

Marie Hamm had a proposal accepted for the 2017 SEALS conference entitled “Rubrics and Checklists and Frameworks - Oh My!” To read her latest publication download (Book Review) Stop Telling and Start Showing Show, Don't Tell: Legal Writing for the Real World by Adam Lamparello & Megan E. Boyd.

Janis Kirkland published a piece in Chemical Waste Litigation Reporter or EPA Administrative Law Reporter, and she will be a regular author for LWI Lives, a publication highlighting members of the legal writing community.  Her additional recent publications for November include summaries of the following cases for publication in Chemical Waste Litigation Reporter:
•    NRDC v. City of Los Angeles
•    In re E.I. DuPont de Nemours C-8 Personal Injury Litigation
•    Hanford Challenge v. Moniz
•    Alaska Oil & Gas Ass’n v. Pritzker

Janis Kirkland also published the following case summaries in EPA Administrative Law Reporter:
•    NRDC v. City of Los Angeles
•    Hanford Challenge v. Moniz
•    Alaska Oil & Gas Ass’n v. Pritzker

Associate Dean Natt Gantt has an article being published by The Learning Curve in the Winter 2017 issue.

Professor Ben Madison and Associate Dean Natt Gantt are presenting at a Symposium of 30th Anniversary of the McCrate Report and 10th Anniversary for Carnegie Best Practices for Legal Education in February.  Their presentation will be published as an article in the St. Thomas Law Review.  To see their most recent work, download Is There a Paradox between Ethics and Happiness? Moral Formation for Lawyers, which they presented at CLS in October.

Professor Jeff Brauch had a proposal on human rights accepted for the ATINER Conference in Athens, Greece in July 2017.  To read his latest publication on that area of law, download Human Rights Protections in the Post-9/11 World.

Associate Dean Lynne Marie Kohm’s piece with Sandra Alcaide entitled, Obergefell: A Game-Changer for Women, was recently listed on SSRN's Top Ten download list for seven different areas of law: ERN: Women & Gender Issues (Topic), LSN: Family Law (Sexuality) (Topic), LSN: Marriage & Other Domestic Partnerships (Topic), LSN: Marriage (Topic), PSN: Other Political Behavior: Race, Ethnicity & Identity Politics (Topic), SIRN: Impact on At-Risk Populations (Race, Ethnicity, Gender, Advanced Age) (Sub-Topic), SIRN: Social Security (Topic) and Social Security, Pensions & Retirement Income eJournal.  Although it was only posted to SSRN late last week, it has already been downloaded 24 times.  Download it here.

11.29.2016

Regent Law Alumnus Finds Success With Own Firm in Norfolk, Virginia

Regent University School of Law alumnus Gabriel McCoy (’11) had never been a part of a Christian higher education institution before.

Gabriel McCoy.Photo courtesy
of Gabriel McCoy.
He recalls very clearly week one, first semester of his 1L year.

“I remember telling my dad that I never met so many people that were as intelligent, hard-working, hungry to compete and loved the Lord all at the same time,” said McCoy. “The caliber of people were elevated, and it was fun to run with this pack of motivated folks.”

To this day, McCoy still runs with his “Regent pack,” after co-founding Pierce/McCoy, PLLC, with Regent Law alumnus Nathaniel Pierce ’08 in April 2013. The firm, based in downtown Norfolk, Virginia, serves clients in Hampton Roads, Richmond, Texas, New York and even Serbia.

The decision to begin the daunting, yet “adventurous” task of beginning a firm came at a time when the legal market was extremely competitive and the “opportunities were few and far between.” McCoy walked in faith and in prayer asked that the Lord would “close the doors” to the wrong opportunities.

“This was the last door that was open that made sense,” said McCoy.

He gave himself a one-year deadline: It was either find enough financial success to support his family or give up and go into banking.

More than three years later, the firm has grown to eight full-time attorneys – five of which are Regent alumni.

“The best people I met in my entire life were people I met at Regent,” he said. Most of all, he said, was his wife, Regent Law alumna Sarah McCoy (‘11). The two dated throughout their three-year tenure at Regent together. And they were married two weeks after taking the Virginia Bar exam.

“Thank God for mothers, they stepped up big and helped us focus on the bar prep,” said McCoy. “Then it was off to the races.”

McCoy said that his time at Regent was a “period of enlightenment,” in his educational career – particularly in regard to the law and how it applies to different situations. While he was taught the rules and guidelines as an attorney at the bar, he believes law woven in with his faith gave him a “brighter North star” to follow when it comes to what’s right and wrong as an attorney.

“Regent’s integrating of its mission and its fundamental foundations was something that I personally enjoyed,” said McCoy. “They did a good job of integrating that law in the mission and not deviating from that mission.”

Apart from helping him pass the bar, McCoy said that the faculty and deans were just as integral in helping him build his practice.

“They were incredibly supportive and really spared nothing in giving me access to resources and people in the community,” said McCoy.

He explained that much of his job as an attorney is helping clients in their “darkest hours.” He’s found an opportunity to witness to clients and the people he works with, and even uses his office space at the World Trade Center to host a Bible study to offer “spiritual strength” to those in the area.

He said that if the only reason in hindsight of him starting his own firm was to have the opportunity to minister to the community in that way, it was worth it.

“It’s your job first to be a good attorney, and then if they’re open to counsel, presenting the opportunity of the gospel,” said McCoy. “Not only to solve [your client’s] immediate legal needs, but to also give them some level of strength and hope.”

Learn more about Regent University’s School of Law.

By Brett Wilson Tubbs

11.28.2016

Regent Law Faculty Achievements - Week of November 28, 2016

Regent University's School of Law Faculty members willingly share their knowledge and expertise beyond the classroom to spark scholarly debate and advance the practice of law. Their latest endeavors include the following.

Associate Professor Brad Jacob made three separate presentations at the CLS national conference with Associate Dean Natt Gantt. Professor Jacob also spoke at Federalist Society law student chapters at the University of Chicago, IIT-Chicago Kent College of Law, and the University of Baltimore School of Law on topics including religious liberty and the 17th Amendment (two separate topics).  To read some of his constitutional law scholarship, download Will the Real Constitutional Originalist Please Stand Up? and Back to Basics: Constitutional Meaning and 'Tradition'. In addition, Professor Jacob preached in Chapel at Grove City and Patrick Henry Colleges and gave a campus lecture at Wheaton College regarding the Supreme Court.  To read some of Professor Jacob’s work on the Court, download Eight Men Out. Make that Nine.

Professor Jeff Brauch spoke on a Higher Law at Michigan State University on Monday, Nov. 7.

Professor Eric DeGroff presented “Environmental Stewardship in Christian Perspective: Establishing Balance in Economic Development and Environmental Protection” at the Ukrainian National Forum on the Environment, and “Private Property and Private Ownership in Christian Legal Perspective” at the National Academy of State Administration in Kiev, Ukraine on Nov. 7. He also guest-lectured at the Yaroslav Mudryl National Law University in Kharkov, Ukraine on Nov. 8, as well as at the National University of Odessa, Ukraine on Nov. 9.  To read Professor DeGroff’s work on the environment, download The Application of Strict Criminal Liability to Maritime Oil Pollution Incidents: Is There OPA for the Accidental Spiller? and Raiders of the Lost ARCO: Resolving the Partial Settlement Credit Issue in Private Cost Recovery and Contribution Claims Under CERCLA.

Last week, Professor DeGroff was also appointed to serve on the Educational Programming Committee (EPC) of the ABA Section of Dispute Resolution by virtue of being co-chair of the Section’s Law Schools Committee.

Associate Professor Jim Davids made several presentations at various Ukrainian Forums in November.

Professor James Duane spoke at the Federalist society chapter at Boston University Law School; he received a note from a BU Law faculty member who was citing his recent article The Extraordinary Trajectory of Griffin v. California: The Aftermath of Playing Fifty Years of Scrabble with the Fifth Amendment several times in a recent article to be published the University of Chicago Legal Forum.  Professor Duane also was recently quoted in the Virginian-Pilot.

Associate Dean Lynne Marie Kohm and Sandra Alcaide published “Obergefell: A Game-Changer for Women,” with the Ave Maria L. Rev. from a symposium last year at BYU which was co-sponsored with Ave Maria.

Professor Ben Madison was invited by the University of Detroit Mercy Law Review to present “The Rubric Meets the Road in Legal Education: Program Assessment of Degree to Which a Law School's J.D. Program is Achieving its Learning Outcomes” as part of their annual symposium to be held March 3, 2017.  Professor Madison also has gotten two project proposals approved for the SEALS conference 2017: “New Law Professors: Classroom Teaching Fundamentals,” and will be leading a discussion group entitled “Elements and Tips in Designing a Course.”  Both are in the framework of the New Law Teachers’ series of panels/discussion groups.

Associate Dean Natt Gantt and Professor Ben Madison have nominated CEFLER for the ABA's Gambrell Award for Professionalism for the work of the Center for Ethical Formation and Legal Reform.

Associate Professor Gloria Whittico submitted a proposal to W&M for their symposium entitled “Implicit Racial Bias,” to be held March 2017. To read some of her excellent work on race and law, see 'If Past Is Prologue': Toward the Development of a New 'Freedom Suit' for the Remediation of Foster Care Disproportionalities Among African-American Children.

Adjunct Professor Carol Rasnic published, "What the German Bundestag Could Learn From the U.S. Congress on the Right to Strike" in the Hungarian Labor Law eJournal.