4.27.2016

Judge West Prepares Christian Leaders for Tough Challenges in their Careers

Violent crime, sexual abuse and broken families are harsh realities the real world offers on a daily basis. Some Regent University graduates will serve in careers that demand close interaction with those involved in challenging situations. While it's impossible to perfectly prepare anyone for these tragedies, The Robertson School of Government (RSG) invited Judge Patricia L. West, distinguished professor, to share stories of ethical challenges she's faced in her career, and how she handled them from a Christian perspective.

Judge Patricia L. West
"God doesn't want us to all be together in a little clump, pat ourselves on the back, and tell each other what great Christians we are," said West. "He wants us to be out there in the darkness. That's the only way that we can ever win anyone."

West sat down and shared stories from her time as a judge in Virginia Beach Circuit Court, Virginia Beach Juvenile and Domestic Relations District Court, and her experience working for Virginia's Attorney General. She shared stories of cases involving tragedy, tough decisions and teachable moments. Facing unrepentant convicted murderers, child sex predators, and victims of haneius crimes took peace, calmness and discernment West says only came from her relationship with God.

"God has granted me the ability to see all of this awful stuff, hate that it happens, but not get jaded by it," said West. "I know it's there, and these things happen, and I cannot explain it apart from God's grace. The things that I've seen and talked about today are a side of the world that most people don't even need to know about, unless they're working in it and want to try to help with it."

As a prosecutor, West counseled and nurtured victims. As a judge, she delivered justice to convicted criminals. After serving sentences, some would come forward and thank her.

"I'm sure a lot of the people I locked up didn't really know I was hoping that I was really making a positive difference in their life, but that was my prayer always, that they would go into prison, and a prison ministry might change their life. They needed to be punished, but my deepest desire, when I imposed those sentences, was that they would come out better people."

West is an associate dean in Regent's School of Law, and is a distinguished professor in the RSG. During her informal "Defense Against the Dark Arts" presentation, guests were able to comfortably ask questions and share experiences.

Learn more about the RSG.
Learn more about Regent LAW.

By Brennan Smith

4.26.2016

Regent Law Faculty Achievements - Week of April 25

Regent University's School of Law Faculty members willingly share their knowledge and expertise beyond the classroom to spark scholarly debate and advance the practice of law. Their latest endeavors include the following.

Professor Eric DeGroff attended and presented at the Representation in Mediation Competition Conference, spending the first two days of his time at the conference in New York last week helping to run this competition.  He was also appointed to serve as the lead co-chair for this ABA committee throughout the next year.  On the final day of the conference, Proffesor DeGroff presented on a panel for a CLE program at the Legal Educators’ Colloquium.  To learn more about his research in this area, see his most downloaded article: Training Tomorrow's Lawyers: What Empirical Research Can Tell Us About the Effect of Law School Pedagogy on Law Student Learning Styles.

Professor Tom Folsom presented and participated in a debate at Faulkner Law School, on April 14, on the topic “Designing New Law for a Coded World—Whether, When, and How (Easterbrook’s ‘Law of the Horse’ 20 years after).”  View some of his work here.

Professor James Duane’s book “You have the Right to Remain Innocent” is #1 again on Amazon.  Professor Duane also presented this week at Stanford Law’s Symposium entitled “Cutting Edge Issues in Criminal Justice,” where he had his own panel.

The paper,  Empowering Love and Respect for Child Offenders through Therapeutic Jurisprudence: The Teen Courts Example that Alison Haefner and Associate Dean Lynn Marie Kohm have published in an online international journal at Sociology and Anthropology 4(4): 212-221 (2016), was featured on Law Professors TypePad’s CrimProfBlog.

Center for Global Justice Administrative Director Ernie Walton is attending a conference called Faith and Law Around the Globe (FLAG) sponsored by CRU (Campus Crusade for Christ) in South Africa, which will run April 20-27.  See him on Twitter with other attorneys at the conference. 

In light of this week’s events at the Supreme Court of the United States, you may want to read Associate Professor Jim Boland’s piece Is Free Speech Compatible with Human Dignity, Equality, and Democratic Government: America, a Free Speech Island in a Sea of Censorship?

4.15.2016

Regent Law Students Complete Competition Season Strong, Ranked #4 Best Moot Court Program in the Nation

Regent University’s School of Law (LAW) students wrapped up the Moot Court Competition season strongly with a second-place overall win at the Touro Law Center’s Third Annual National Moot Court Competition in Law & Religion Competition in Islip, New York on Thursday, April 7, and Friday, April 8.

Photo courtesy of the Regent Law
Facebook page.
LAW students Adam Burton '17, Cassandra Payton '16, and Lucille Wall '17 were coached by LAW professor Bruce Cameron. In addition to taking home the second-place victory, Wall earned marks for Best Oralist in the competition.

This most recent victory contributed to Regent Law’s current status as 4th in the nation for best Moot Court program out of more than 200 law schools accredited by the American Bar Association by the University of Houston Law Center. This is currently the highest ranking in Regent LAW history.

Schools that finish within the top-16 rank for the 2015-2016 academic year are invited to compete in Houston’s national Moot Court championship in January 2017.

“I am very proud of Lucy, Adam, Cassie, and their coach, Professor Cameron. This is the third year in a row that we have competed and won significant awards at the Touro competition, which reflects the longstanding and ongoing commitment to excellence in our moot court program,” said Michael Hernandez, dean of the School of Law. “Our students and faculty have done a phenomenal job this year.”

Learn more about Regent University School of Law.

By Brett Wilson Tubbs

4.12.2016

School of Law Continues to Progress in Moot Court Competitions

There are many marks of a great lawyer. Apart from oral arguments, legal writing is key. Regent University School of Law students proved their merit at the Price Media Moot Court Competition in Oxford, England, Wednesday March 30-April, 2.

Price Media Moot Court Team.
Photo courtesy of the Regent School of Law
Facebook page.
The team – Christy Hurst, Palmer Hurst and Sandra Alcaide, coached by LAW professor Jeffrey Brauch – took home the Second-Best Memorial in the World at the international competition.

Additionally, two Regent teams traveled to the Billings, Exum & Frye Competition at Elon School of Law in Greensboro, North Carolina. The first team, including law students Brittany Jones, Daniel Rouleau, and Joshua Gamboa, earned Best Respondent Brief award and overall Best Brief in the competition of 40 teams.

The second team consisting of law students, William Thetford, Lindsey Gilman, and Sam Walsh earned the Best Petitioner Brief award.

“This performance validates that our legal writing and skills training is second to none, in the U.S. and around the world,” said Michael Hernandez, LAW dean. “We prepare our students not just to be moot court champions, but to be highly skilled, principled, and ethical advocates who will serve clients with excellence and better the world around them. I am very proud of our students and their accomplishments!”

According to the University of Houston Law Center annual Moot Court Program rankings, Regent’s Moot Court Program currently stands as seventh-best out of all American Bar Association (ABA) accredited law schools. This places Regent's Moot Court ranking above other universities such as Georgetown University Law School, Texas A & M School of Law, William and Mary University Law School and Yale Law School.

Regent’s competition season will continued Thursday, April 7 as law students entered the Touro Competition at the Touro Law Center in Central Islip, New York.

Learn more about Regent University’s School of Law.

By Brett Wilson Tubbs | April 8, 2016

Regent Law Faculty Achievements - Week of April 11, 2016

Regent University's School of Law Faculty members willingly share their knowledge and expertise beyond the classroom to spark scholarly debate and advance the practice of law. Their latest endeavors include the following.

Assistant Professor Tessa Dysart appeared on CBN News again regarding the SCOTUS nominee. Watch it here.

Associate Professor Brad Jacob appeared several times on WNIS 790 AM at 9 AM discussing law and politics.

Professor Tom Folsom debated at the Southern Methodist University, Dedman School of Law, in Dallas, TX, on March 9, presenting “Streamlined Innovation or Regulatory Capture? A Five Year Retrospective on the America Invents Act.”

Professor Natt Gantt and Associate Dean Lynn Marie Kohm presented at Pepperdine’s Annual Nootbar Conference, “Teaching Millennials to Love Justice,” discussing in a plenary session how to build an appreciation of justice for millennials as law students (as previously set out at The Emperor Has No Clothes, But Does Anyone Really Care? How Law Schools are Failing to Develop Students' Professional Identity and Practical Judgment) particularly in the context of family breakdown costs to millennials (see A Fifty-State Survey of the Cost of Family Fragmentation).

Center for Global Justice Administrative Director Ernie Walton will be attending a conference called Faith and Law Around the Globe (FLAG) sponsored by CRU (Campus Crusade for Christ).

Allison Haefner and Associate Dean Lynne Marie Kohm have published "Empowering Love and Respect for Child Offenders through Therapeutic Jurisprudence: The Teen Courts Example," in an online international journal at Sociology and Anthropology 4(4): 212-221 (2016). This paper was also presented at the American Society for Criminology Annual Conference, in Washington, D.C. back in November.

Professor Craig Stern’s SSRN downloads have recently topped 1,200 all-time downloads. View his research.

Associate Dean Ben Madison’s SSRN downloads just topped 500 for the year, and he’s approaching 2,000 all-time downloads.  View his publications.

Professor James Duane’s latest book You Have the Right to Remain Innocent, is now available for pre-order on Amazon, where Amazon has currently ranked it in the top 10 "Hot New Releases" in the Social Sciences Reference area. Professor Duane has also seen his SSRN numbers rise above 2,000 in total downloads, and more than 1,200 for the past twelve months.  View his publications.

3.28.2016

School of Law Teams Continue to Perform in Moot Court and ADR Competitions

As law schools across the nation enter further into the moot court competition season, Regent University School of Law (LAW) students continue to perform well. The weekend of March 18-19 was no exception.

J. Gibbons Moot Court Team.
Photo courtesy of Regent's School of Law
Official Facebook Page.
“The excellent performances of our moot court and negotiations teams this past weekend continue our track record over the past two decades of outstanding skills training and student performances,” said Michael Hernandez, dean of the School of Law. “I am proud of our teams and their faculty coaches, who are outstanding representatives of Regent Law and our Center for Advocacy.”

Regent’s team achieved the title of “quarterfinalists” at the J. Gibbons Moot Court Competition at Seton Hall Law in Newark, New Jersey. Kathleen Knudsen ’16, Renee Knudsen ’16, and Andrew Butler ’16 were coached by LAW professor James Duane.

R. Knudsen earned the title of “best oralist”; Butler took home the “second-best oralist” honor.

Team members Glenn Reynolds ’16, Courtney Marasigan ’17, and Alexandra McPhee ’17 – coached by LAW assistant professor Tessa Dysart – won the Charleston Moot Court Competition. Reynolds earned the title “best oralist” for the final round of the competition.

Additionally, Jessica Rigsbee ’17 and Chelsea Harkins ’17 finished second-place overall at the Robert R. Merhige, Jr. National Environmental Negotiation Competition at the University of Richmond. The team was coached by LAW professor Eric DeGroff.

Learn more about Regent University’s School of Law.

By Brett Wilson Tubbs | March 28, 2016

3.14.2016

Regent University’s Center for Global Justice Hosts Global Justice Symposium


Fifty years have passed since the landmark U.S. Supreme Court case Griswold v. Connecticut, famously declared a Constitutional “right to privacy." This case led to other famous Supreme Court decisions, like the turning of Roe v. Wade and the constitutional right to abortion.

Tiffany Barrans ’09 (LAW).
On Friday, March 4th, Regent University School of Law’s (LAW) Center for Global Justice, Human Rights, and the Rule of Law held its 5th annual symposium titled, “Women’s Rights 50 Years after Griswold v. Connecticut.”

The symposium provided a series of forums that explored the rights of women living in the United States and women living in other areas of the world. The event opened with a panel discussion titled, “Women’s Rights at Home,” moderated by assistant LAW professor, Tessa Dysart.

Panelists Stephen Casey, president and senior counsel at Casey Law Office, P.C. and co-founder of Texas Center for Defense of Life; Teresa Stanton Collett, professor at the University of St. Thomas School of Law; and Vivian Hamilton, professor of Law at William and Mary Law School, discussed the current climate of women’s rights in the United States.

The second panel was moderated by LAW professor Jeffrey Brauch, and explored women’s rights in the international context. The panel featured experts such as Azizah Y. al-Hibri, professor emerita of Law at the University of Richmond School of Law, and founder and chair of KARAMAH: Muslim Women Lawyers for Human Rights; Isaac Kfir, visiting professor of International Affairs & Law at Syracuse University College of Law; Christine Venter, director of Legal Writing Program at Notre Dame Law School; and Tiffany Barrans ’09 (LAW), former International Legal Director at the American Center for Law and Justice.

In her career, Barrans has represented before the United Nations, the European Court of Human Rights and the European Parliament. She spoke of a trip she took to Iraq, a nation with a prescribed “traditional and honor-driven society.”

Barrans explained that a certain religious group, the Yazidi, value purity in women insofar as to participate in “honor killings” if a woman’s honor is besmirched or worse, taken from her.

Barrans explained the “top down” approach to reforming rights in nations abroad. She said that many times the line between “religion” and “culture” is blurred. Within the Yazidi tribe, the spiritual leader sought a doctoral change that allowed women to reintegrate into their society.

“Now women have a chance to be ‘clean’ again,” said Barrans. “And though the work isn’t finished, the local leadership is stepping up.”

Following the series of discussions, The Honorable Marla Graff Decker from the Court of Appeals of Virginia spoke on women’s rights in the Commonwealth of Virginia. The symposium concluded with an evening benefit banquet at the Founders Inn and Spa titled, “Justice for the Unborn.” The dinner featured a former director of Planned Parenthood turned pro-life advocate, Abby Johnson.

Learn more about Regent University’s School of Law and the Center for Global Justice, Human Rights, and the Rule of Law.


By Brett Wilson Tubbs |  March 8, 2016

3.07.2016

Regent Law Faculty Achievements - Week of March 7, 2016

Regent University's School of Law Faculty members willingly share their knowledge and expertise beyond the classroom to spark scholarly debate and advance the practice of law. Their latest endeavors include the following.

Associate Dean Lynne Marie Kohm and Associate Professor Kathleen McKee presented "Examining the Associations between Sustainable Development Population Policies and Human Trafficking" at the Christopher Newport University Conference on the Global Status of Women and Girls. Visit the Regent Law Family Restoration blog for a review of their presentation and a photo of them with the wife of CNU's president, Rosemary Trible, who is also President of Fear2Freedom.

Professor Natt Gantt and Associate Professor Gloria Whittico will be presenting their proposal “Improving Summer Start and ASP Orientation Programming in Light of Changes in Entering Student Profiles” at the 2016 AASE Conference.

Associate Professor Brad Jacob has had several TV and radio interviews regarding Justice Antonin Scalia. View his TV interviews at the following links:

WAVY TV
WTKR TV
CBN NEWS

Associate Dean Lynne Marie Kohm and Professor Natt Gantt will be presenting at Pepperdine’s Annual Nootbar Conference, “Teaching Millennials Law.”  Their presentation will be based on an appreciation of justice in the context of instruction in professional responsibility (as previously set out at The Emperor Has No Clothes, But Does Anyone Really Care? How Law Schools are Failing to Develop Students' Professional Identity and Practical Judgment) and family law (with state costs of family breakdown previously set out in A Fifty-State Survey of the Cost of Family Fragmentation), examining the problem of moral formation in the context of a millennium generation of law students.