9.19.2014

Three More Regent Law Alumni Appointed as Judges

Three more Regent University School of Law alumni have been appointed to judgeships, bringing the total number of Regent Law alumni currently serving on the bench to 28.

The Virginia General Assembly filled eight vacant judgeships during a special session on Thursday, September 18.

Earle C. Mobley ’89 was appointed as a judge for the Portsmouth Juvenile and Domestic Relations Court. Mobley has served as the commonwealth’s attorney in Portsmouth since 2002.

Phillip C. Hollowell ’98 was appointed to the Virginia Beach Juvenile and Domestic Relations Court. Most recently, Hollowell has served as deputy commonwealth’s attorney in Virginia Beach.

David Morgan Barredo '01 was appointed Culpeper County’s Deputy Commonwealth’s Attorney, as the new Juvenile and Domestic Relations Court Judge for Virginia’s 16th District.

In addition, Joseph A. Migliozzi ’94 (pictured), who had been serving as a judge in Norfolk General District Court since 2009, was promoted to the Norfolk Circuit Court.

“We praise God for his blessing – and we are thankful to have these men of strong intellect and character in such important positions,” said Jeffrey Brauch, dean of Regent School of Law.

To date, 34 Regent School of Law graduates have served as judges in Virginia and other states.

Learn more about Regent University School of Law.

Faculty Achievements: Week ending September 19, 2014

Professor James Boland's latest publication entitled, "Is Free Speech Compatible with Human Dignity, Equality, and Democratic Government: America, a Free Speech Island in a Sea of Censorship?" is now available on SSRN.

Professor Eleanor Brown is working on a piece entitled, "A Common Morality: Toward a Framework for Designing Fiscal Instruments to Respond to Global Climate Change" that will develop a common morality argument for environmental responsibility.

Professor Kenneth Ching presented to the University Faculty last week on his work on Bonhoeffer entitled, "Would Jesus Kill Hitler".

Professor C. Scott Pryor's paper, "Who Bears the Burden? The Place for Participation of Municipal Residents in Chapter 9", was recently listed on SSRN's Top Ten download list for: Political Economy: Budget, Deficit, & Debt eJournal.

The Honorable Patricia West will be the keynote speaker for the Second Annual Senator A. Willis Robertson Lecture on Virginia Politics on September 23, 2014, from 12-1pm in the Moot Courtroom.

9.17.2014

Regent University Faculty Members Present Research

Regent University's faculty members and their research topics are as diverse as the subject matter they teach. To share their research and unite their interests, Regent's Faculty Senate hosted its second Faculty Research & Scholarship presentations on Friday, September 12.

"Academic excellence is fundamental to Regent's mission, and we look for excellence beyond teaching; we encourage our faculty's research activities and developed this event to help show our support," said Dr. Paul Bonicelli, executive vice president. "It's also valuable for faculty colleagues from Regent's diverse academic disciplines to have these opportunities to learn from each other and to possibly find common research interests for future collaborations."

Dr. Andrew Quicke, chair of the Faculty Senate, also prompted Regent's esteemed faculty members to share their interests and findings, and encouraged his peers to spur conversations about their involvement in projects related to their distinguished fields.

"These presentations have been a dream for the Faculty Senate for two years," said Quicke, professor in the School of Communication & the Arts (COM). "We love each other, but we don't know each other."

Dr. Emilyn Cabanda, associate professor in the School of Business & Leadership (SBL), opened the presentations, sharing findings from her book, Managing Service Productivity Using Data Envelopment Analysis. In the book, Cabanda along with her colleague, Dr. Ali Emrouznejad from Aston Business School, delve into recent developments in service productivity.

Kenneth Ching (pictured), professor in the School of Law, presented his paper "Would Jesus Kill Hitler? Bonhoeffer, Church, and State." In his research, Ching explored Christian life in a pluralistic society.

Dr. William Cox, professor in the School of Education (SOE), presented his paper "Inconclusive Teacher Impact Research—a Biblical Interpretation." Cox's research explored the effects that interpersonal relationships have on student learning.

In April 2014, Dr. Mary Manjikian, associate dean and associate professor in the Robertson School of Government, Dr. Ben Fraser, associate professor in the School of Communication & the Arts, and Dr. Mark Yarhouse, professor in the School of Psychology & Counseling, took part in the Faculty Senate's first round of presentations.

Learn more about Regent University's award-winning faculty.

By Brett Wilson

9.12.2014

Faculty Achievements: Week ending September 12, 2014

Dean Jeffrey Brauch’s article, "Human Rights Protections in the Post-9/11 World", was recently listed on SSRN's Top Ten download list for: PSN: Effects of Terrorism (Topic).

Professor Eric DeGroff and alum Steve Fitschen ('99) completed an article on de facto parenthood & the rights of natural parents in same-sex relationships.  Is it Time for the Court to Accept the O.F.F.E.R.?  Applying Smith v. Organization of Foster Families for Equality and Reform to Promote Clarity, Consistency, and Federalism in the World of De Facto Parenthood will be published in the Spring 2015 edition of the Southern California Interdisciplinary L. J.

Professor Eric DeGroff has been invited to write a book chapter for publication as part of an international environmental law encyclopedia,  expected to be published next year by Edward Elgar Press.  The book will be one of 11 volumes and will focus on environmental decision making, with Eric's chapter addressing access to information in the U.S. and the E.U.

Professor Lynne Marie Kohm completed "A Brief Assessment of the 25 year Effect of the Convention on the Rights of the Child," which will be published by Cardozo Journal of International and Comparative Law.

Professor Lynne Marie Kohm's article with Elizabeth Oklevitch, "Federalism or Extreme Makeover of State Domestic Regulations Power? The Rules and Rhetoric of Windsor (and Perry)", was recently listed on SSRN's Top Ten download list for: LSN: Family Law (Sexuality) (Topic), LSN: Marriage (Topic), PSN: Domestic Politics & International Courts (Topic) and PSN: Other Social Welfare Policy (Topic).

On Sept. 4 at Liberty University, Law School Professor Lynne Marie Kohm presented "Unpacking Windsor and Subsequent Cases and Their Implications for Family Law," offering a presentation from the article posted on SSRN entitled "Federalism or Extreme Makeover of Family Law? Rules and Rhetoric of Windsor (and Perry)," published by the Elon Law Review.

Professor Lynne Marie Kohm's casebook with Lynn D. Wardle (BYU) and Mark S. Strasser (Capital), Family Law from Multiple Perspectives (West 2014) was completed and published.  See more about it athttp://www.westacademic.com/Professors/ProductDetails.aspx?NSIID=3044.

Professor Lynne Marie Kohm's piece on Ray and Janay Rice was published in the CNSNews.com commentary section.

9.08.2014

School of Law Hosts Second Eagle Awards

As Regent University School of Law seeks to provide excellent education for its attorneys-in-training, it also esteems the students who have proven to be the best and brightest in their classes.

On Thursday, September 4, the School of Law hosted its second Eagle Awards ceremony in the Moot Court Room.

Jeffrey Brauch, dean of the School of Law, and Douglas Cook, professor and associate dean for Academic Affairs and Student Services, honored students who achieved the highest grades in all 87 of Regent's law classes for the 2014 spring and summer semesters.

The name of the ceremony comes from Isaiah 40:31 which says, "Those who hope in the Lord…will soar on wings like eagles."

"The Eagle Awards celebrate students and their dedication to excellence; this is especially important given our Christian mission," said Brauch. "Colossians 3 urges us: 'Whatever you do, work at it with all your heart, as working for the Lord, not for men.' The Eagle Awards honor students who are worshipping God through excellent work. In doing so, they honor God as well."

While several students were honored for their highest ranking in more than one class, Diana McGraw '15 (pictured) earned the highest grade in four of her second-year law classes. McGraw is enrolled in Regent's accelerated J.D. program.

"I don't know which class was my favorite, they were all good," said McGraw. "It required a lot of reading, studying and doing homework assignments just to be prepared."

McGraw was recognized for outstanding performance in her Constitutional Criminal Procedure, Torts, Property and Civil Procedure courses. She accomplished this all while working and maintaining a household of four children.

"It's busy, but at the same time, I think it's a good balance," said McGraw. "I have to keep in mind everything that's going on in the house."

Regent began the Eagle Awards ceremony—also known as "the Book Awards"—in January 2014, at the prompting and generous donation of Ron Fick, a trust and estates attorney in Florida and father of Allison Fick '14.

"A lot of the top-notch law schools have Book Award ceremonies, and I just thought we should have the same thing here, and everyone agreed," said Fick. "It's a great thing for a student to have on his or her resumé because employers look at it, and it's a big deal to finish number one in your class."

Fick, who received his own Book Award in Criminal Law during his time in law school, was also present to witness Allison earn an award for her third-year class in Corporate Tax.

"That was special; that was one of the reasons this whole thing got started," said Fick.

He recalls bringing his daughter for a visit to campus in 2011. After she was accepted into several law schools, he explained it was a "blessing" that Allison chose Regent as the school that would prepare her for her job with the American Center for Law and Justice.

"She could have gotten a diploma at any university, but she got so much more at Regent," said Fick. "The professors love their students and love Jesus and it really comes across."

Learn more about Regent University School of Law.

9.05.2014

Faculty Achievements: Week ending September 5, 2014

Dean Jeffrey Brauch challenged the Law School faculty, students and staff, the deans of Regent's other graduate schools, along with its College of Arts & Sciences, and  Dr. Paul Bonicelli, Regent's executive vice president, to the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge, and they accepted. Watch the video here.

Professor Scott Pryor's paper, "Who Bears the Burden? The Place for Participation of Municipal Residents in Chapter 9", was recently listed on SSRN's Top Ten download list for the topic of Other Political Economy: Budget, Deficit, & Debt.

8.25.2014

Campus Accepts Ice Bucket Challenge

Facebook news feeds have been filled with videos of mostly individuals doing the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge. But, at Regent University, doing things in community means a lot. That's why about 250 people came out Thursday, Aug. 21, for a "mass" ice bucket challenge.



"We believe in serving together and this is a prime example," said Dr. Paul Bonicelli, Regent's executive vice president. "We came together for a great purpose, to help raise awareness and support a cause that has affected people in the Regent community. So many of us know family and friends diagnosed with this devastating disease. Today, we helped change the world just a little through our effort and our donations."

Bonicelli announced that Regent was making a generous donation, along with the participants' donations, to the John Paul II Medical Research Institute.

"We chose the John Paul II Medical Research Institute for several reasons," Bonicelli said. "First, they have a pro-life approach to research, which is consistent with our values. Second, their research has application to a wide variety of illnesses, including ALS. And finally, they devote more than half of their budget to research, which is more than many similar foundations."

The challenge began at the university's weekly chapel service on Wednesday, Aug. 20, when Jeff Brauch, the dean of Regent's School of Law, announced via video that a Regent alumna had challenged him. He accepted and challenged the Law School faculty, students and staff, as well as the deans of Regent's other graduate schools, along with its College of Arts & Sciences, and Bonicelli.

Word spread quickly around campus, and the turnout exceeded expectations. Besides the ice bucket challenge participants, at least another 75 people came out to donate and watch the dousing on the University Library Plaza.

At Thursday's event, Brauch extended another challenge, to the College of William & Mary's Marshall-Wythe Law School Dean, Doug Davis. Bonicelli challenged Dr. David Buckingham, vice president of student affairs at Virginia Wesleyan College, and Regent alumnus Pat McCarty, head of Norfolk Christian School.

The Regent community embraced the challenge, and afterward, many people asked if the university would consider a similar charitable group event each year during the first week of classes.

Activity and comments on Regent's social media channels confirmed the community's enthusiasm. "Awesome" was a common word describing the event. Student Christina Teasdale summed it up in her Facebook comment when she learned Regent was participating in the Ice Bucket Challenge:

"My dad was diagnosed with ALS this year. I'm proud to be part of a university that would support this cause."

8.21.2014

6th Annual Community Service Day

 As the summer days begin to dwindle, many students focus on purchasing books, gearing up for their new class schedules and settle in for the fall semester. But on Friday, August 15, 150 Regent University School of Law students turned their focus toward the needs of the Hampton Roads community during the sixth-annual Community Service Day.

Students dispersed to various service locations in the area such as the Chesapeake Bay Foundation, Habitat for Humanity, St. Mary's Home for Disabled Children, Union Mission, the Society of St. Andrew and the Bridge Christian Fellowship Swap & Shop. There, students volunteered for a variety of activities, including sorting food and clothing donations, facilities work, gleaning and oyster restoration.

Jeffrey Brauch, dean of the School of Law, explained that students' participation in these different community service projects is a simple reflection that Regent students' priorities are in the right place.

"They come to this school because they see law as a means to serve others and their communities," said Brauch. "It's immensely gratifying to see our entire student body display that heart to serve right at the beginning of a new year."

As a third-year law student, Erica Weston explained how easy it is to get caught up in focusing on studying, classes and her future career. Weston spent the day volunteering at the Bridge Christian Fellowship, where they were preparing for a clothing swap. Her favorite part of service was being able to visually see their work making a difference as large stacks of clothes that were donated for the swap were folded and organized.

"My focus should be on others, and the community service day is a great way to connect with the local community," said Weston.

Second-year law student Jessica Clark spent the morning aiding the Chesapeake Bay Foundation's Oyster Restoration team. Throughout the day she learned about collecting and cleaning oyster shells shipped from local restaurants in order to provide a home for newly spawned oysters to attach to in the ocean.

"I think it's important to serve others because of the example Christ set for us during His time on earth," said Clark. "It was so great to be able to participate in a short-term project with a cause that helps the community in the long term."

This willingness to serve is what Darius Davenport, director of Career and Alumni Services in the School of Law, believes molds legal scholars into legal practitioners. And though it is, perhaps, contrary to what many assume, the role of a lawyer is primarily to be a "servant."

"There's no better way for a law student to begin his or her law school experience than to be in service to their community," said Davenport. "Over the last six years I've witnessed how Community Service day has transformed and inspired many students to continue to serve in Hampton Roads."

Learn more about Regent University's School of Law.

Photos courtesy of Anca Potoan.