2.02.2016

Regent's School of Law Teams Make Waves in Start of Moot Court Competitions

The game is strong for Regent University’s School of Law (LAW) 2016 Moot Court competition teams.

Each January, the top 16 Moot Court programs in the United States are invited to participate in the annual Andrews Kurth Moot Court National Championship at the University of Houston. Regent was selected to participate after being ranked 8th in the nation by the University of Houston Law Center at the conclusion of the 2015 competition season.

Price Media Law Moot Court Team.
Photo courtesy of Christy Hurst.

During the competition January 28-29, students Renee Knudsen, Palmer Horst, and Marie Dienhart defended their way to second-place in the nation, just behind Georgetown as they competed with teams from schools such as Southern Methodist University, New York University and Texas Tech University. The Regent team also took home the award for best brief.

The team was coached by LAW dean, Michael Hernandez.

“The success of our teams is a testimony to the purpose and quality of a Regent Law education. Moot court competitions test the primary essential skills of lawyering—analytical ability, legal research, persuasive writing and speaking, teamwork, and advocating for a client under pressure,” said Hernandez. “These achievements reflect that the quality of the skills training and legal education provided by Regent Law stands out in the U.S. and around the world.”

Continuing the streak, Christy Hurst, Palmer Hurst and Sandra Alcaide won first place at Regional Rounds in the Americas of the Price Media Law Moot Court Competition in New York City this past weekend.

The team, coached by LAW professor Jeffrey Brauch, won the best brief, and Alcaide earned the marks for best oral advocate. This is the second year in a row that a team from Regent has swept the competition.

“Advancing to the international rounds is a tremendous honor. We know we’ll be up against the best in the world, which is an exciting opportunity, but still a daunting challenge,” said C. Hurst. “Looking back at all of our hard work, it is satisfying to know that it was well worth all of the time spent! It is also a testament to God’s blessing of our preparation that we are able to continue to Oxford. I saw His hand at every step of the way as he walked us through the rounds this week! From giving our team the side we wanted to argue in each round to removing potential obstacles, we were tremendously blessed.”

They will advance to the international championship rounds of the competition at Oxford University March 30-April 2nd, the same competition where Regent’s team placed second in the world in 2013.

Additionally, the team did a home-turf victory lap on Monday, February 1, making an appearance on the Christian Broadcasting Network’s 700 Club. Watch the interview here.

“I was very proud watching the Regent team compete this weekend. Palmer Hurst and Sandra Alcaide competed at a very high level and grew stronger by the round. Their diligent preparation combined with their natural giftedness made them a powerful team. I was also proud of the work the entire team – Sandra, Palmer, and Christy Hurst – did on the memorials (written arguments),” said Brauch. “To win the Best Memorial for the entire Western Hemisphere is a tremendous accomplishment. We praise God for his grace! And we are excited to compete for the world championship in Oxford next month.”

Learn more about Regent University’s School of Law.

By Brett Wilson Tubbs | February 1, 2016

School of Law Presents the Ronald L. Fick Book Award Ceremony

Ronald L. Fick Book Award recipients.
When Ronald Fick, shareholder and attorney at Dunwody White & Landon, P.A. in Palm Beach, Florida, learned that his daughter, Allison Fick ’14 (LAW) received the highest grade in her Contracts I course, he proudly proclaimed that she would receive the book award for her efforts.

But he didn't know that, at the time, Regent University’s School of Law had no book award program.

“I decided I’d make a concerted effort to see if I could convince Regent to begin giving these awards to honor future students, like today’s recipients,” said Fick.

Due to that effort, Regent launched its first set of book awards in January 2014. The second set was awarded in September 2014, just in time for Fick’s daughter to be presented with an award for the highest marks in her Corporate Tax class.

“All’s well that ends well,” Fick said to LAW students, faculty and staff at the Ronald L. Fick Book Award Ceremony on Thursday, January 21st. This semester’s ceremony honored students who received the highest marks in their fall 2015 courses.

“Today, I’d like to take a moment to thank the law school administration and faculty who are working very hard to prepare you students to become the next generation of lawyers,” said Fick. “Regent has assembled one of the finest law school faculties in the country. All of the men and women who serve on this illustrious faculty are not only accomplished in their particular area of law, but are also men and women of God.”

Additionally, Jared Birckholtz ‘10 (LAW), alumnus and staff counsel for Geico, presented a monetary award for excellence of performance in Negotiations and community service. He congratulated the book award recipients, and encouraged them to keep their focus on their character.

“I’ve come to realize the integrity that you have carries over and is a huge part of your practice,” said Birckholtz. “Seventy-five percent of my job is building relationships and being a man of my word. You all have the book-knowledge; you’re very smart. And you’re well-equipped because of the faculty here. Build on that integrity.”

Law students Cassandra Payton ‘16 and Sean Mitchell ’15 received the Geico honor. Mitchell said the honor was not something he won on his own, but was a collection of all his studies at law school and the guidance from the faculty. He recalled shopping in Home Depot the day he received an email notifying him that he had been admitted into law school.

“I immediately dropped to my knee in the middle of Home Depot and thanked God for all he’d done and what he was going to do. So my plan for late April after I take the bar exam is to go back to that same Home Depot and wait,” said Mitchell with a laugh. “My only hope is that I’ll do whatever it is that God has for me to do.”

Payton also received the book award for her Secured Transactions course, a feat that she never thought was possible until she changed her priorities. She began to find joy, and even fun, in her studies.

“I was so shocked that I’d achieved the highest grade in two classes, and it was the semester I wasn’t trying for the grade’s sake, I was trying for the sake of the Lord,” said Payton. “I think last fall was one of my best semesters because I had a great time. I enjoyed my work.”

Learn more about Regent University’s School of Law.

By Brett Wilson Tubbs | January 27, 2016

2.01.2016

Regent Law Faculty Achievements - Week of February 1, 2016

Regent University's School of Law Faculty members willingly share their knowledge and expertise beyond the classroom to spark scholarly debate and advance the practice of law. Their latest endeavors include the following.

In December of 2015, Professor James Duane published a short essay, "The Extraordinary Trajectory of Griffin v. California: The Aftermath of Playing Fifty Years of Scrabble with the Fifth Amendment," with Stanford’s online Criminal Law Journal, available here on SSRN.  Connected to that piece and another article by Professor Duane on Fifth Amendment privileges (view here), this 3-minute video had been online for only two days and was viewed almost 5 million times.  It has now been viewed more than 8.5 million times.  Furthermore, this story at The Blaze provides a nice summary of the synergy of these events, all from scholarship and teaching well integrated.  This has made a great increase in our SSRN downloads as you can see from the right hand side of this chart, and being number one on the following SSRN Top Download lists:

  • Evidence & Evidentiary Procedure eJournal
  • Criminal Procedure eJournal
  • Law & Society: Criminal Procedure eJournal

His article also placed second on the Criminal Law & Procedures eJournal list!  Well done, Professor Duane.

Professor James Duane also was recently interviewed on CBN News regarding the Center for Medical Progress’ grand jury indictment of the Planned Parenthood investigative journalist videos on fetal tissue harvesting and sales. View the interview here.

Assistant Professor Tessa Dysart’s article, The Origination Clause, the Affordable Care Act, and Indirect Constitutional Violations, that she presented to us at a fall Law Library Faculty Colloquium event, was cited in the amicus brief, Association of American Physicians and Surgeons, found here. Assistant Professor Dysart also appeared on local TV at the request of WVEC reporter Mike Gooding regarding the Supreme Court's initial lack of action on the McDonnell appeal. View it here.

Professor Craig Stern’s article paper, "Mens Rea and Mental Disorder," was recently listed on SSRN's Top Ten download list for Criminal Law eJournal, and LSN: Criminal Offenses & Defenses (Sub-Topic).

Associate Professor Kathleen McKee’s latest article, a book review on An Alternative to "Business as Usual?" Evangelical Christian Executives: A New Model for Business Corporations by Lewis D. Solomon. New Brunswick, J.J.: Transaction Publishers. 2004. pp. 177, will soon be published and posted at SSRN.  And, many of you were present at the Law Library Faculty Colloquium Tuesday January 26, when Associate Professor McKee and Associate Dean Lynne Marie Kohm presented their article on "Sustainable Development, Family, and Human Trafficking." They will also be presenting this research at Christopher Newport University’s Global Conference on Women in March.

The next Law Library Faculty Colloquium will feature Associate Professor Gloria Whittico. More information.

Center for Global Justice Administrative Director Ernie Walton’s blog on children’s rights was picked up by CNSNews.com's commentary section found here.

Professor Natt Gantt and Associate Dean Lynne Marie Kohm will be presenting in the final plenary session of the annual Nootbaar Conference at Pepperdine on Doing No Harm.

Be sure to mark your calendar and register for the Center for Global Justice 5th Annual Symposium, Women's Rights: 50 Years After Griswold v. Connecticut to be held March 4th, 2016. This event includes two panel discussions, a two-credit ethics CLE, luncheon and a banquet with featured speaker Abby Johnson, former director of a Planned Parenthood clinic and now prominent pro-life advocate. Presidential candidate Carly Fiorina has also been invited to speak. For more information on the conference, the CLE and to register, visit the Center for Global Justice website

1.15.2016

Regent Law Faculty Achievements -- October 30 - December 11, 2015

Regent University's School of Law Faculty members willingly share their knowledge and expertise beyond the classroom to spark scholarly debate and advance the practice of law. Their latest endeavors include the following.


WEEK OF OCTOBER 30, 2015:

Assistant Professor Tessa Dysart is the featured scholar on the Scholastica blog. This is a great feature for Professor Dysart and for Regent as Scholastica is the elite law review submission distribution site, and their article featuring her work is now being disseminated to a nation of elite legal scholars. 

At the Law Library Faculty Colloquium this past week, Assistant Professor Tessa Dysart presented her article "The Affordable Care Act, the Origination Clause, and Indirect Constitutional Violations," published by the Cornell Journal of Law & Public Policy.

Associate Professor Brad Jacob was a featured speaker for the forum at Cedarville College on October 21, where he presented and a Cedarville political science professor moderated the legal and moral implications of Obergefell v. Hodges for Christians as well as how the church should respond. Please note that Professor Jacob will offer a message considering an analysis of Obergefell on November 17 at the next Regent Law Library Faculty Colloquium to be held in the Law Library's third floor balcony.

Last week, Regent Law Graduate Assistant Sandra Alcaide and Associate Dean Lynne Marie Kohm presented a paper on the "Future of Marriage after Obergefell," at BYU Law School. This provided an excellent scholarly mentoring opportunity. View the symposium's presentations online:

Past Conferences
Symposium October 12th Recordings

Professor Eric DeGroff's work will be featured at the University Faculty Research & Scholarship Presentations on November 13, where he will present "The Dynamics of the Contemporary Law School Classroom."

On Friday, October 2, Associate Professor James Davids gave a presentation to the CCCU Attorneys' Conference entitled "The Last Stand: The Ministerial Exception: How to Position Your Institution to Gain the Most Benefit from the Ministerial Exception." View his SSRN page.

Center for Global Justice Administrative Director Ernie Walton's
essay, "Conservatives Should Attack Obergefell's Interpretations Method, Not its Hijacking of the Democratic Process," was recently listed on SSRN's Top Ten download list for: AARN: Political Organization (Topic) and AARN: State & Non-State Political Organization (Sub-Topic).

This week, Associate Professor Gloria Whittico posted her very pivotal original historic research on custody litigation brought by freed slave mothers to seek family reunification with their children. Read her work here:

'A Woman's Pride and a Mother's Love' the Missouri Freedom Suits and the Lengths and Limits of Justice

'If Past is Prologue': Toward the Development of a New 'Freedom Suit' for the Remediation of Foster Care Disproportionalities Among African-American Children 

Additionally, her excellent piece in memoriam to the beloved late Chief Justice Leroy Hassell, is available here.

Professor Natt Gantt and Associate Dean Lynne Marie Kohm will be presenting at Pepperdine Law School's upcoming Nootbaar Conference, March 11-12, 2016. The conference is titled, "Doing Justice without Harm," and their presentation will focus on methods legal educators can adopt to promote a love for justice among law students who will become lawyers to act as healers in a hurting world. They will address an appreciation of justice in the context of a student body of millennials who have grown up in an age of family and societal breakdown. The problem of moral formation is particularly acute in the context of a millennium generation of law students who have often been raised in an era of family law fluidity, family breakdown and parental dysfunction. We will address how the law can best be taught to promote the ideals of justice and empower students as healers of future client relationships, while also recognizing that many of those same students have faced the greatest harm from the law in their own personal experience through situations such as divorce, family breakdown, or racial injustice.

The Center for Global Justice is presenting its Fifth Annual Symposium of the Center for Global Justice, Human Rights, and the Rule of Law on March 4, 2016, on "Women's Rights: 50 Years After Griswold v. Connecticut." This symposium will explore the history and future of women's rights in light of developments in the 50 years since the landmark decision in Griswold v. Connecticut, where the Supreme Court declared a new constitutional right to privacy. The symposium will kick off with a panel discussion about the current state of women's rights in the United States, the likely future direction of the Supreme Court, and other pertinent issues relating to women's rights. A second panel will follow and will discuss the status of women's rights internationally. Topics to be discussed may include strategies to employ to advance women's rights in Muslim and African countries, where women are often guaranteed rights on paper but not in practice, and whether the women's rights movement is a form of western imperialism. Following the morning panel discussions, the symposium will include a lunch and two-credit ethics CLE for Virginia attorneys, which will be led by Thomas E. Spahn of McGuireWoods, LLP. Tom has spoken at more than 1,400 CLE programs throughout the U.S. and in several foreign countries. The symposium will conclude with an evening banquet at The Founders Inn, where banquet proceeds will benefit the Center for Global Justice, Human Rights, and the Rule of Law internship grant program and other human rights projects. For information, visit www.regent.edu/justice.


WEEK OF NOVEMBER 20, 2015:

Associate Professor Brad Jacob did a great job presenting “A Christian response to the impact of Obergefell” at the Law Library Faculty Colloquium by unpacking a biblical approach with regard to sexual immorality and state policy decisions in marriage.  View some of Professor Jacob's work.


Judge Patricia West and Associate Professor Kathleen McKee were a part of a Forum last night for Child Advocacy in Juvenile Justice Reform.

Associate Professor Jim Davids was presenting lectures on the rule of law and Christian discipleship principles to Eastern European Leadership Forums at various law schools throughout Kiev, Ukraine.  View some of Professor Davids' publications

This week, Law Graduate Assistant Ally Haefner and Associate Dean Lynne Marie Kohm presented “Teen Courts – Juvenile Justice Reform through Child Participation,” at the American Society for Criminology’s annual conference in Washington DC.  Download their article. You can find photos of their efforts on Regent Law Facebook and Twitter pages.

Associate Dean Ben Madison attended the ABA Associate Dean Curriculum Workshop at Whittier Law School in Costa Mesa, CA last weekend on “Building an Assessment Plan from the Ground Up.”  As associate dean in charge of working on ensuring we come into compliance with ABA Standards on program assessment (Standards 301, 302, and 303) and Standards on Variety in Classroom Assessment (Standards 314 and 315), he was able to connect with other associate deans, ABA spokesman Barry Currier, and the experts in assessment in legal education.  View Associate Dean Madison's work

Professor James Duane’s piece “The Proper Pronunciation of Certiorari” was the most frequently read article in this month's online issue of the ABA Journal. View the article.  


Associate Professor Gloria Whittico’s paper, "'If Past is Prologue': Toward the Development of a New 'Freedom Suit' for the Remediation of Foster Care Disproportionalities Among African-American Children" is ready for your download and review here

Center for Global Justice Administrative Director Ernie Walton’s article, “Conservatives Should Attack Obergefell's Interpretive Method, Not its Hijacking of the Democratic Process," was recently listed on SSRN's Top Ten download list for: LSN: The Judiciary & Judicial Process (Topic). View the abstract and download it here

Associate Dean Lynne Marie Kohm's article, "The Unspoken Consequences of Obergefell: Calling Convictional Christian Scholars," was recently listed on SSRN's Top Ten download list for: Law & Religion eJournal. View the abstract and download statistics here.

Professor Natt Gantt and Associate Dean Lynne Marie Kohm had their proposal accepted for presentation at the Pepperdine Law School’s Nootbar Institute in March of 2016, where they will be speaking on “Teaching Lawyers to do Justice in an Age of Family Breakdown.”

Associate Professor Kathleen McKee and Associate Dean Lynne Marie Kohm submitted a proposal to the Christopher Newport University Conference on the Global Status of Women and Girls to be held in March of 2016. If accepted, they will be presenting their work on the effects of global policies toward sustainable development on women available here, which has just gone over 100 downloads.


WEEK OF DECEMBER 11, 2015:

Assistant Professor Tessa Dysart with Judge Leslie Southwick will publish the 3rd Edition of "Winning on Appeal" with the National Institute for Trial Advocacy in 2016.

Associate Professor Kathleen McKee and Associate Dean Lynne Marie Kohm had their proposal accepted for the Christopher Newport University (CNU) international conference on the Global Status of Women and Girls sponsored by the College of Arts & Humanities at CNU in Newport News, VA on March 3-5, 2016. We will be presenting "Examining the Associations between Sustainable Development Population Policies and Human Trafficking," 23 MICH. ST. INT'L L. REV. 1 (2014). View the abstract.

Professor Craig Stern has just posted a book chapter entitled, “Mens Rea and Mental Disorder.”  View the abstract here and find the book here.

Center for Global Justice Administrative Director Ernie Walton’s paper, "Conservatives Should Attack Obergefell's Interpretive Method, Not its Hijacking of the Democratic Process," was recently listed on SSRN's Top Ten download list for: AARN: Political Organization (Topic) and AARN: State & Non-State Political Organization (Sub-Topic), and can be downloaded here.

12.02.2015

Regent University School of Law Students Visit The United States Supreme Court



Regent University School of Law (LAW) students are one step closer to the United States Supreme Court.

School of Law Students Visit
The United States Supreme Court.
Photo courtesy of Tessa Dysart.
This month, Assistant Professor Tessa Dysart took her Honors Constitutional Law class to visit the United States Supreme Court and have a Q&A session with Justice Elena Kagan.

Kagan shared her experiences and insights with students regarding her work as Solicitor General and her work on the other side of the bench.

"She's such an incredibly kind and gracious person," said Dysart. "I wanted my students to learn about the Supreme Court and how it operates…I have so much respect for her and how much she cares about the Constitution and how she comes to decisions. By observing a Supreme Court argument, the students were also able to see that not every case in front of the court is a hot-button issue, and that the court works hard to get those cases right."

Kagan was the first female dean of Harvard Law School when Dysart was a student. Second-year law student, Chris Holinger, said that Dysart's connection with Justice Kagan is what made him realize his professors are committed to helping him become not only a scholar, but a good steward.

"It was an experience that lots of law students never get to have and it just shows what a great opportunity we have to study at a school with faculty who have these kinds of relationships and are willing to put in the effort to make experiences like this possible," said Holinger. "Experiences like this challenge our thinking and force us to develop reasoned responses and makes us better thinkers, and ultimately better lawyers."

For 2L student Alison Haefner, the highlight of the trip was speaking with Justice Kagan. She appreciated the time that the justice spent with her class, answering their questions about her judicial philosophy, and both her work as Solicitor General and on the Supreme Court.

"It was truly an honor," said Haefner. "Since I started at Regent, it's become increasingly obvious to me how amazing our law professors are. Not only do they have connections with the Supreme Court justices, they care about our development enough to set up these once-in-a-lifetime opportunities for us."

By Brett Wilson Tubs | November 19, 2015

11.10.2015

Regent Hosts National Constitutional Law Moot Court Competition


Earlier this month, Regent University's Moot Courtroom was filled to the brim with trial advocate competitors from all over the nation who participated in the Leroy R. Hassell Sr. National Constitutional Law Moot Court Competition, hosted annually by Regent's School of Law (LAW).

Matthew Dunckley (left) at the
Moot Court Competition.
Photo courtesy of Matthew Dunckley.
Fall Semester 2015 marked the 15th year that LAW has hosted the competition. This year 15 teams, made up of about 50 competitors, participated in the event. The chief justice, for whom the competition was named, was the first African-American to preside on the Virginia Supreme Court.

"He was a great friend of this school," said Jason Rodriguez '16 (LAW), chairman of Regent's Moot Court team. And though Hassell passed away in early 2011, the school continues to host the competition in his honor.

Rodriguez was active in his hospitality service to the competitors. He and his teammates had an "all hands on deck" approach to the weekend, ensuring the competitors and various speakers were comfortable and had necessary transportation.

"It's really an amazing opportunity to meet with people and to talk with competitors," said Rodriguez. "It's always cool to see their reaction to Regent."

According to Rodriguez, the competition always reflects well on Regent's Moot Court Board, and helps hone in on the true definition of service.

"It also gives us a great opportunity to see what it's like out there practicing law in reality," said Rodriguez.

"Hosting the competition gave Regent Law the opportunity to foster excellence in appellate advocacy skills by providing competitors with engaging issues and outstanding judges," said Matthew Dunckley '16 (LAW), legal writing director for the board.

Dunckley enjoyed spending time with the visiting justices, judges and Regent Law alumni, and said he is excited for the year of advocacy trial competitions ahead.

"The people are the most important part of any competition Regent Law hosts," said Dunckley. "At times the event felt like a reunion of friends from whom I've learned and continue to learn much. Personally I hope I imparted greater joy in those around me during their experience here, and I am confident that next year's board will carry on the tradition of demonstrating servant leadership in the joy of the Lord."

Learn more about Regent University's School of Law.

By Brett Wilson Tubbs | October 28, 2015

10.22.2015

Regent Law Faculty Achievements - October 9, 2015

Regent University's School of Law Faculty members willingly share their knowledge and expertise beyond the classroom to spark scholarly debate and advance the practice of law. Their latest endeavors include the following.


Professor Jeff Brauch spoke October 2 at the Christian Legal Society Annual Meeting on "The

Christian and Human Rights."  Professor Brauch has also been appointed the Vice Chair of the Advocates International Board, the global Christian legal advocacy organization.  Download his previous publications on human rights here

Professor Natt Gantt presented his work entitled “Leadership Development for Law Students” in Denver at the Educating Tomorrow’s Lawyers (ETL) Conference.

Associate Professor Kathleen McKee presented “Sexual Assault and College Campus Culture” at last weekend’s Regent University Law Review Symposium on College Culture, Sexual Assault and Due Process.

Associate Professor Gloria Whittico attended the Memorial Service for Julian Bond in Washington, D.C. at the personal invitation of Morris Dees, co-founder of the Southern Poverty Law Center. 

Professor Craig Stern will present “Positive Rights: Threat or Menace?” on Oct. 13 at noon in RH 116 on behalf of the Center for Global Justice, Human Rights, and the Rule of Law.  To download some of Craig’s additional work in this area of law go to http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=1129745 and http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2574823

Professor Eric DeGroff will present his article at the University Faculty Colloquium on Nov. 13 on “The Dynamics of the Contemporary Law School Classroom: Looking at Laptops Through a Learning Style Lens,” which can be found here

Professor James Duane has been a key member of the Boyd-Graves Conference of the Virginia Bar Association and will be attending their annual conference Oct 16-17 where he will join others in making recommendations regarding potential changes to legislation.

Professor Tom Folsom is presenting at the Oct 8-10, 2015 Intellectual Property Scholars Roundtable at Texas A&M Law School a paper entitled "What to Do with Our Broken Patent System.” Download his previous work on patent law here

Associate Dean Lynne Marie Kohm and Sandra Alcaide will be presenting “Women After Obergefell,” at the BYU Marriage Symposium Oct. 11-13.  Remote viewing of this Obergefell symposium will be available at www.law.byu.edu/obergefell.

9.25.2015

Regent Law Faculty Achievements - September 25, 2015

Regent University's School of Law Faculty members willingly share their knowledge and expertise beyond the classroom to spark scholarly debate and advance the practice of law. Their latest endeavors include the following.

Professor Natt Gantt’s and Assoc. Dean Ben Madison’s paper, "Teaching the Newly Essential Knowledge, Skills, and Values in a Changing World," was recently listed on SSRN's Top Ten download list for: AARN: The Legal Profession.  View/Download their paper.
Next week, Professor Natt Gantt is presenting on “Leadership Development for Law Students” at the Educating Tomorrow’s Lawyers Conference in Denver, Colorado.

On October 13, Craig Stern, executive director of the Center for Global Justice, Human Rights & the Rule of Law, is presenting "Positive Rights: Threat or Menace?" to kick off the 2015-16 Center for Global Justice Forums.

Assoc. Dean Lynne Marie Kohm's paper, "The Unspoken Consequences of Obergefell: Calling Convictional Christian Scholars," was recently listed on SSRN's Top Ten download list for: AARN: Case Studies of Religious Groups (Topic); AARN: Christianity (Sub-Topic); AARN: Family Law (Topic); LSN: Family Law (Sexuality) (Topic); and PSN: Post-Conflict Reconciliation (Topic). View the abstract | Full article. She will also present this work in progress as part of the new Faculty Colloquium Series.