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Regent Law Completes 600 Hours of Community Service

Taking the phrase "many hands make light work" literally, 150 students, alumni, faculty and staff from Regent University's School of Law held its annual Community Service Day on Friday, Aug. 19. The group completed an estimated 600 hours of work at a number of locations around Hampton Roads, including the Chesapeake Bay Foundation, Habitat for Humanity, Norfolk Law Library, St. Mary's Home for Disabled Children, Union Mission, Foodbank of Southeastern Virginia and The Bridge-Swap & Shop.

"We were able to provide real and significant help to individuals and organizations in our community," said Regent Law Dean Jeffrey Brauch. "In doing so we were able to extend the love of Christ with both actions and words. Plus, the day was just fun &. After a week of academics, it was a joy to put the books aside and make new friends as we worked shoulder-to-shoulder for the good of others."

Among other things, the students shucked 2,000 pounds of corn at a farm in Virginia Beach, served 230 families at the Foodbank and provided the equivalent of two weeks of full-time groundskeeping at St. Mary's. They also worked on the grounds and sorted books at Union Mission and helped with clothing and school supply distribution at The Bridge.

"It's grown every year," observed Darius Davenport, director of Regent Law career and alumni services. "Students who participated in the past are coming back." Several returning students, alumni and faculty worked alongside the new students. The annual event concludes a week of orientation events for first-year Regent Law students.

"Local outreach, service, and fellowship are some of the reasons I enjoy participating each year with other volunteers from Regent University School of Law during Community Service Day," explained Jennifer Meyer, a second-year law student. "Over the last two years, I have learned how Regent Law embraces the university's mission, for Christian leadership to change the world. By emphasizing the importance of engaging in servant-leadership in the local community, Regent Law has taught me that community service coincides with Christian leadership and is a part of implementing positive change in the world."

"This event is important because it serves to remind the community that students at Regent Law care about people," said third-year student Eric Bensinger. "As Christ's servants, it is important to serve Christ by serving other people in need. Community Service Day gives students that opportunity."

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Life, liberty, pursuit of happiness and the right to due process: Regent University School of Law (LAW), Roberson School of Government (RSG) and College of Arts & Sciences (CAS) explored the Fifth Amendment promised to citizens in the United States Constitution on Monday, September 18.

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