6.07.2007

Regent Law School Hosts Third Annual Judicial Internship Banquet

On June 7, 2007, Regent Law School’s Office of Career & Alumni Services sponsored the 3rd Annual Judicial Internship Banquet. The Judicial Internship Program allows first year law students an opportunity to intern with local courts. Each year a dinner is held to honor the judges and courts who participate in the program, thus making the entire program possible.

This year marks the largest participation rate for the Judicial Intern Program which began in 1998. Fifteen local courts participated accommodating thirty-one student volunteers. Students volunteer for a minimum of eight weeks for twenty hours a week.

Darius Davenport, Director of Regent Law Career & Alumni Services, introduced the night’s four speakers.

Emily Sheets, a participant in the program and a rising 2L, commented how valuable the integration of education with legal experience is for law students. She said that through the program, students learn the real importance of courtroom clerks to their future success in the courtroom.

Jeff Riddle, also a rising 2L, noted that there was no substitute for being able to watch the players of a courtroom in person. He talked about how personally witnessing a capital murder trial had completely changed his perception of criminal law and was now looking forward to his future criminal law class.

The Honorable Alfreda Talton-Harris, Chief Judge of the Suffolk Juvenile & Domestic Relations District Court, noted the importance of being able to perceive the players in the courtroom. Real experience is extremely important, allowing students to observer how a lawyer’s conduct and approach influences the outcome of real life cases.

Finally, the Honorable Patricia West of the Virginia Beach Circuit Court concluded the speakers of the night. Judge West pointed out that intern experience served as a self esteem builder for students because it allowed students to realize that court work is something they can handle, as well as allowing interns to get to know judges as real people and thus remove some of the tension they might feel in the courtroom situation.