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Regent Law Professor Awarded Fulbright

Grant to take him to India


Regent Law Professor, C. Scott Pryor, has been awarded a Fulbright Scholar grant to lecture at the National Law University in Jodhpur, India in the spring of 2009.

Pryor will teach courses in Comparative Law and International Business Transactions as well as research selected topics of Indian law for comparison to U.S. law. He is one of approximately 800 U.S. professionals who will travel abroad during the upcoming year on a Fulbright scholarship.

Pryor’s appointment in India won’t be his first time teaching internationally. This summer, he’s chairing the Regent Summer Program on International Human Rights in Strasbourg, France. He has also taught at Handong International Law School in Korea. “Teaching in other countries has greatly enriched my understanding of other cultures and legal systems. It has also demonstrated the breadth of the world-wide Body of Christ, the Church,” he said.

The purpose of the Fulbright program is to build mutual understanding between the people of the United States and the rest of the world.

Pryor sees his work there through the same lens: “[India] is a nation of increasing world-wide economic and political importance. I hope that my posting there will establish long-term relationships with prospective Indian lawyers, current attorneys, faculty and judges.”

Highly selective, Fulbright grants are awarded on the basis of professional and academic achievement, as well as demonstrated leadership in a given field. To learn more about Professor Pryor’s work and Regent’s other outstanding professors, visit Regent’s Faculty page.

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