11.30.2011

Programs in France and Israel Broaden Legal Perspectives

Picture floating in the Dead Sea, visiting the City of David, or walking through Hezekiah's tunnel, all while earning course credit and learning about Israel's government and legal system. Or, picture learning about international law and human rights issues firsthand from officials of European legal and human rights organizations.

Regent University law and government students with an adventurous spirit and heart for travel will have the opportunity to apply for two unique study abroad opportunities taking place in summer 2012.

For five weeks in Strasbourg, France, Regent Law students can take six units in the areas of civil liberties and national security law, international human rights, comparative criminal procedure, and origins of the western legal tradition. Courses will be taught by former Attorney General and current distinguished professor John Ashcroft and professors Michael Hernandez, James Duane and Eric DeGroff.

Second-year law student Jillian Reding, the current graduate assistant for the program, emphasized, "This is an incredible experience you are just not going to get in any other way in law school."

Previous participant, Nicole De La Zerda also offered praise of the program. "I can promise you, you will not regret it if you go," she said. "Academically, it is doable. Why not do it in France?"

Amanda Moss, another former student of the program, said, "Academically, this program is great," and recommended that students begin classes with an open mind. "International Human Rights law is going to stretch your mind and stretch your opinion," she said.

Students will arrive in Strasbourg on June 30 and leave after August 5.

Registration is also open for law and government students interested in joining Dr. Robert "Skip" Ash, an associate professor in the School of Law, and Dr. Joseph Kickasola, a professor with joint appointments in the Robertson School of Government and Regent Law, in the a summer program in Israel, May 18 - June 6.

Students will take classes titled "Holy War and Just War in Islam and Israel" and "Issues of International Law and the State of Israel."

Third-year law student Scott Lambert described the Israel program as being "more than a tourist trip." Lambert highlighted the program as providing "good exposure to government issues" and said he had no problems walking around Jerusalem either during the day or evenings. "I felt totally safe," he said.

Olivia Summers, a second-year law student, agreed. "It was an amazing trip," Summers said. "You really get to meet some incredible people and there's never a dull moment."

Students in the program will have access to areas that are usually unavailable to the typical tourist and enjoy a full itinerary of historical sites and museums.

Learn more about the Strasbourg program.

Learn more about the Israel program.

By Stephanie Hartman