3.24.2014

Regent Law Faculty Bloggers Engage Christian Community

Many Regent Law professors are active bloggers, writing about topics ranging from their legal passions, such as bankruptcy law, professionalism, and how to be a Christian lawyer, to current events.

In Pryor Thoughts, Professor Scott Pryor dialogues about bankruptcy law, but he also sprinkles in lighthearted articles about the new LEGO movie and Regent University’s production of The Trojan Women.

"I use Pryor Thoughts as a platform to refine my own thinking about legal matters and about the relationship of the Christian faith to the law in particular and culture generally," says Professor Pryor. "Additionally, it provides me with a way to let folks who don’t read law review articles know about the scholarly articles I’ve written."

Professor Lynne Marie Kohm (pictured) started Family Restoration to address the relationship between the law and God’s plan for families, and to encourage her audiences that family reconciliation and restoration are obtainable realities.

“Regent Law students have the opportunity to receive excellent training to serve as counselors at law and to study in an environment that will challenge their own spiritual growth while they learn how to provide remedies for family breakdown,” she says. “They learn how to be healers of human conflict and to use the law to work toward family restoration. This blog gives voice to those events, connecting solutions to current events in family law.”

Professor Bruce Cameron manages Sabbath School Lessons and GoBible.org. He began GoBible.org in 1996.

Professor Cameron says that GoBible.org has received about 1.8 million unique visitors and 8.4 million page views since March 2009, and has reached nearly every country in the world. Sabbath School Lessons has had about 388,000 unique visitors and 1.3 million page views since March 2009.

“I am completely surprised at the reach of GoBible.org,” he says. “Tens of thousands around the world study my lessons weekly. Statistics are one thing, but the reality of this hit home a few months ago when I attended a lawyer’s conference in California. On Sabbath, I visited a small local church for the first time, and was astonished to realize that the lesson being taught was mine!”

In addition to Professor Pryor, Professor Cameron, and Professor Kohm, several other Regent Law professors informally write about their areas of expertise: